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  1. #1
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    Default Grandfathers Mother Nottingham to London

    My Grandfather was adopted at a young age with no Father listed on his Birth Certificate. I am assuming his Mother had him out of Wedlock but don't have any information about the case other than birth certificate and adoption certificate.

    Details:

    Mother originally from Nottingham and listed as working as a nurse in Nottingham on Birth Certificate, but gave birth to him in London (102 City Road) and listed her residential address as 29 Buxton Street, Brick Lane, E1, London.

    Born 1928
    Adopted 1932

    I have a few questions to hopefully someone who is experienced in this field.

    1. Was this common back in the 1920's/30s?
    2. Why did it take over 3 years for him to be adopted?
    3. Is there any information on the addresses given?
    4. What are the odds of finding the biological Father?
    5. I found some information that suggested a Curate lived at the residential address given on the Birth Certificate in 1920, is this a sort of case the Church would have likely been involved in? I'm pretty sure the Curate wasn't his Father and I don't know if he still lived at the address in 1928.

    Other than a DNA test, where's the next best step?

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks

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    Default

    In response to this and your post on the address search,29 Buxton St in 1911 was occupied by
    John Ernest Langley Frost & wife Hilda.

    John was a clerk in the holy orders,you say a curate was at the address later.Was this the same man?

    1939 the address was occupied by a family named Levy.

  3. #3
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    102 City Road
    This was the City of London Lying-in Hospital (later the City of London Maternity Hospital).

    Have you checked for surviving records?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pamelawagster View Post
    In response to this and your post on the address search,29 Buxton St in 1911 was occupied by
    John Ernest Langley Frost & wife Hilda.

    John was a clerk in the holy orders,you say a curate was at the address later.Was this the same man?

    1939 the address was occupied by a family named Levy.
    I found a Notices of Dividends in 1920 stating Leslie George Barron, 29, Buxton-street, London, E. Clerk in Holy Orders.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Goodey View Post
    This was the City of London Lying-in Hospital (later the City of London Maternity Hospital).

    Have you checked for surviving records?
    How would I go about checking surviving records? This is the first person i've researched.

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    See the LMA Research Guide

    https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/thin...-hospitals.pdf

    City of London Lying In Hospital,
    City Road, Finsbury (H10/CLM)

    Also for married women only, this was founded in 1750 in Aldersgate Street in the City of London and moved to City Road in the parish of St Luke, Old Street in 1773.
    It was renamed the City of London Maternity Hospital in 1918. After part of the building was destroyed by bombing in 1940-1941, the hospital moved to Hanley Road, Islington. It closed in 1983.

    Records deposited in London Metropolitan Archives include:
    • Inpatients’ admission registers 1750-1769, 1861-1948
    • Baptism registers 1813-1978
    • Out-patients’ admission registers 1872-1953

    Take the "for married women only" with a pinch of salt.

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    Hi Peter,
    I've tried to PM you but says your storage is full, would you mind deleting some messages so I could message you.

    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Goodey View Post
    See the LMA Research Guide

    https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/thin...-hospitals.pdf

    City of London Lying In Hospital,
    City Road, Finsbury (H10/CLM)

    Also for married women only, this was founded in 1750 in Aldersgate Street in the City of London and moved to City Road in the parish of St Luke, Old Street in 1773.
    It was renamed the City of London Maternity Hospital in 1918. After part of the building was destroyed by bombing in 1940-1941, the hospital moved to Hanley Road, Islington. It closed in 1983.

    Records deposited in London Metropolitan Archives include:
    • Inpatients’ admission registers 1750-1769, 1861-1948
    • Baptism registers 1813-1978
    • Out-patients’ admission registers 1872-1953

    Take the "for married women only" with a pinch of salt.

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