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    Default Passenger List - UK to South Africa (ca 1850)

    Hi,

    My Great Grandfather emigrated to South Africa as a child. His name was either James Way or James White and was born circa 1835 in Dorset, England. He got married in George, South Africa in 1857 with the name James Way and his first 3 children were baptized with the surname "Way". His children were in later years (Post 1885) found in church records with the surname "Wayd" and later "White". His eldest son was William James Way (later White) and his second eldest daughter was Sarah Elizabeth Way (later White). I therefore assume that his parents were probably William & Sarah. According to a note made by my late Grandmother, James came to South Africa when he was 15 years old (circa 1850). According to a letter he wrote as part of an Anglo Boer War Compensation Claim, he came to South Africa as a child. Any help in finding a name on a passenger list that could be a possible match for the description given above, would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you

    Johann

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    Super Moderator Sue Mackay's Avatar
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    Sadly passenger lists from the UK to South Africa don't start until 1890. Occasionally you may be lucky and find one in a newspaper, but these listings tended to name the captain and first class passengers and then say "and 300 in steerage". Have a look at the Passenger List Project on eGGSA at http://www.eggsa.org/arrivals/eGGSA%...20Project.html or the newspaper transcriptions at http://www.eggsa.org/newspapers/, which are both searchable, but I'm afraid it won't be easy!
    Sue Mackay
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    Thanks for the reply Sue.
    I have previously looked at Eggsa, but unfortunately without success. So it seems like I have reached a dead-end for now wrt passenger lists. The odds are in favour of them being part of the "300 in steerage" that you referred to. Do you perhaps know if there is a list of ships that visited the Southern and Eastern Cape (Between Algoa Bay and Mossel Bay) during the 1840's and 1850's?

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    Newspapers such as the Grahamstown Journal and others did have a Shipping News section. I confess I have never included it in my Grahamstown Journal transcriptions as it listed ships and cargoes rather than people.

    You may find this site of interest
    https://www.geni.com/projects/Britis...e-1800-s/16190
    Sue Mackay
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    Thanks Sue, I have been stuck at this point for a few years now and think I should perhaps try a different strategy and perhaps revisit the passenger lists at a later stage. I will start a new thread to try and find a James Way or White (born in Dorset approx. 1835) with parents William & Sarah.
    I am almost certain that he would have been included in the 1841 Census.
    There is a realistic chance that he might have been included in the 1851 Census
    And I have a marriage record in South Africa that proves that he had left the UK by 1857.

    Thanks for the help thus far.

    Johann

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    Default Passenger List - UK to South Africa (ca 1860)

    Hi all,

    I did see a previous and older thread (2008!!!) which mentioned a book:
    "Aided Immigration from Britain to South Africa 1857-1867" by Esme Bull (Pretoria 1991)
    which apparently has a lot of information for immigration to South Africa.

    Does anyone know where to find a copy of this book? I'm in New South Wales, Australia and the only two libraries that have it on their shelves are in Victoria, so I can not nip out and have a look for myself!!!

    I'm trying to track John AGNEW and his wife Margaret and son John S J who arrived in 1859-1860 from England. I've been told that there is a lot of "Agnew Information" available in this book!

    Thanks in advance for any help and guidance!

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    Super Moderator - Completely bonkers and will never change. Pam Downes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megsy-Magus View Post
    Hi all,

    I did see a previous and older thread (2008!!!) which mentioned a book:
    "Aided Immigration from Britain to South Africa 1857-1867" by Esme Bull (Pretoria 1991)
    which apparently has a lot of information for immigration to South Africa.

    Does anyone know where to find a copy of this book? I'm in New South Wales, Australia and the only two libraries that have it on their shelves are in Victoria, so I can not nip out and have a look for myself!!!

    I'm trying to track John AGNEW and his wife Margaret and son John S J who arrived in 1859-1860 from England. I've been told that there is a lot of "Agnew Information" available in this book!

    Thanks in advance for any help and guidance!
    In England at least we have an inter-library system whereby you can request a copy of a book from a library other than your local one. Unless you know for definite that such a system doesn't exist in Australia, then it's worth asking.

    Option two, is to personally contact the two libraries and ask if they could do a look-up for you. I would initially ask if the book has an index, and if so, is the Agnew name (in particular John and Margaret) listed. They should do that bit free of charge, though a more detailed look-up could cost. You then have to decide whether it's worth paying, say twenty-five dollars, for what could be only two lines of information.
    If there's no index, then somebody basically has to read the book until they find the name. (Possibly, though not necessarily, easier if the chapters are divided into time periods as although John arrived circa 1860 he might not be mentioned until 1870.)

    ADDED:

    Perhaps someone in the UK could make enquiries about the book at their library.

    Pam
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    Thanks, Pam - we do have an inter-library system and I will have to investigate whether it works interstate, though I think that only works with the National Library.

    I was hoping to actually acquire a copy so I guess I will have to haunt the 2nd-hand bookstores!!!

    Megan

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    Super Moderator Sue Mackay's Avatar
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    I have a copy. I wouldn't exactly say it's a "lot" of Agnew information (unless I'm missing something elsewhere).

    John AGNEW 22 Farm labourer from Warwick, travelling to Police, Cape Town
    Margaret AGNEW 22 Dressmaker travelling to John AGNEW, ex constable, Cape Town later Queenstown
    John S.J. AGNEW, infant
    Looks as if he sailed on the Bride, arriving June 1859 and she sailed with the child on the Tudor, arriving February 1860

    There is more information on the ships which I can scan and send to you. Send me a private message with your e-mail.
    Sue Mackay
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    That's "them" - the Agnew family I am after. Thank you so much, Sue! I will PM you regarding the shipping info.

    Megan

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