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  1. #1
    Needs glasses to read properly but knowledgeable and very helpful. pipsqueak's Avatar
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    Default Fenland people & places, 1823-26

    I would put this in a county forum except the places I want to find out about are in different counties.

    I'm working on transcribing a Will written in 1823 with a Codicil added in 1825, which was Proved in 1826. The Will mentions several parcels of land which were purchased from some people and bequeathed to others. I've been trying to Google up some information about these places (and people) but some are eluding me. Any strange spellings would either be a mistranscription on my part or they are spellings used in the document (eg "ffen" for "fen"), but it could be quite interesting to see if anyone here knows any of these people and places.

    Names of people in 1823:

    Stephen CHERRINGTON (of Crowland)
    Stephen CHERRINGTON
    Robert CHERRINGTON (of Pinchbeck)
    Richard CHERRINGTON
    Sarah CHERRINGTON
    John CHERRINGTON
    William CHERRINGTON
    Mary Ann CHERRINGTON
    ffrances CHERRINGTON
    Elizabeth & Samuel PRICE [Elizabeth nee Cherrington is my g-g-g-gm]
    Isaac Congreve HARDY
    George TOOLEY
    John & Mary TOOLEY (aka 'The Elder', of Crowland)
    John TOOLEY (the Younger)
    William TOOLEY
    Thomas TEAT
    John DOLBY
    Thomas ATKINS
    Ann & George CASSWELL (of Postland)
    Stephen Cherrington CASSWELL
    Mary CASSWELL
    Richard CASSWELL
    Henry CASSWELL
    Sarah CASSWELL
    John CASSWELL
    Stephen Joyce CASSWELL
    Robert Derby CASSWELL
    Elizabeth CASSWELL
    William ELAM
    WIlliam FFRENCH
    Christopher & Susannah SOUTHWELL
    Mary Ann SOUTHWELL
    Thomas Orby HUNTER, Esq.
    Robert GREEN
    Samuel GREEN
    John COLESON
    Joseph DICKINSON
    John RENOW
    Reverend Fortor BUCKWORTH
    Theophilus BUCKWORTH, Esq
    Mary CLEAVER
    Ann CLEAVER
    Samuel DOADS
    James SPOOK or HOOK
    John ALLEN
    Mary Ann ALLEN
    Benjamin ARCH
    Stanford BEVERIDGE

    Places mentioned, other than those above:

    Moulton and Moulton Chapel
    Leverington Parsons Drove
    Whapload
    Whapload Drove
    Whapload Drove Common
    Newborough
    Borough ffen
    Holbeach Common
    Alderlands of Crowland
    Kings Delph
    Mowborough
    Coggush Land

    Finally, can anyone explain these terms for me please?

    Washes
    ffodderlots
    Appurtenances
    Messuage
    "without impeachment of or for any manner of waste except wilful waste"


    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    A messuage is a dwelling plus appurtenances (outbuildings, garden, perhaps land)

    Could washes be wastes?

    Ffodderlots sounds as if it could be something to do with fother/fodder meaning a load. What's the context?

  3. #3
    Beloved Friend RIP Thomasin's Avatar
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    I thought that perhaps washes meant some kind of inlet or bay, like 'The Wash' which is not too far from this area.

    'ff' was used for capital F.

    Thomasin

  4. #4
    Jan1954
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    I have found a reference to fodderlot on British History Online, referring to the Fenlands:

    Men with little or no land could support themselves through their rights over the extensive common pastures and fens, listed in 1340 as fodderfen, turffen, fodderlot, and sheeplot.

  5. #5
    Needs glasses to read properly but knowledgeable and very helpful. pipsqueak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Goodey View Post
    A messuage is a dwelling plus appurtenances (outbuildings, garden, perhaps land)
    That's what I thought.

    Could washes be wastes?
    I don't think so (see below). I did wonder if it's to do with the drainage of the fens.

    Ffodderlots sounds as if it could be something to do with fother/fodder meaning a load. What's the context?
    Here is the full context:
    And I give and devise unto my Nephew Richard Cherrington a Son of my brother William Cherrington all that my Copyhold Messuage in the East Street in Crowland and four Acres of land in the Alderlands with all the Appurtenances to the same belonging (except the allotments on the late Common the fodderlots and the Washes) now or late in the occupation of the said Richard Cherrington and Samuel Doads and purchased by me of James Spook(?) to hold the same to the said Richard Cherrington his heirs and Assigns for ever
    This is the only place on the document where fodderlots is spelt with only one F. Here it is on the will:



    Fodderlots could be common land, as seems to be indicated in Jan's reference.

  6. #6
    Geoffers
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipsqueak

    Is there mention of livestock in this will - especially sheep - or was this known to be an area were sheep were kept?

    If so, then 'washes' might refer to washpits for sheep-dipping.

  7. #7
    Needs glasses to read properly but knowledgeable and very helpful. pipsqueak's Avatar
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    There is no mention of sheep or any other animals, but they were farmers, of course. One tract of land was specifically stated as being given to Arable crops and another was Meadow. Other than that, there are no specifics. Several parts of the Will have the same words, ie: ".....with all the Appurtenances to the same belonging (except the allotments on the late Common the fodderlots and the Washes)" , always in connection with "the late Common" which sees to have been part of an "Inclosure" which I take to refer to more land reclamation in the Fens.

    I need a Fen historian I think!

  8. #8
    Geoffers
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipsqueak
    I need a Fen historian I think!
    You might try the Wisbech and Fenland Museum.

  9. #9
    Jan1954
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipsqueak View Post
    I need a Fen historian I think!
    Try the Fenland Family History Society.

  10. #10
    Beloved Friend RIP Thomasin's Avatar
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    I found this definition of 'wash' by Googling:

    A piece of ground washed by the action of a sea or river, or sometimes covered and sometimes left dry; the shallowest part of a river, or arm of the sea; also, a bog; a marsh; a fen; as, the washes in Lincolnshire.

    Thomasin

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