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  1. #1
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    Default DoB - 1939 register different to birth cert

    Hi there,

    So I'm 99% certain I have the correct census records, and other references for my great-grandfather (John Henry Parry). Today I decided to buy his birth certificate, and the birth quarter does not match with his given DoB in the 1939 register. I have his obituary citing him, my grandfather, my mother and two aunts, with the address, and also I have the 1939 register with the same address (he was also living with his widowed sister at the time, which backs up all of the census records), but the date doesn't fit the quarter in the GRO.

    His birthday in the 1939 register is the 16th September 1887, and in his militia attestation he puts his age as 17 years and 10 months (the date of the attestation was 11th May 1905, which would put his birthday in June 1887) but the GRO record which I found says it's in the 4th quarter. Could this be that his birth was registered in the 4th quarter - perhaps after he was baptised (I don't have a baptism record), and perhaps he made himself older for the militia?

    I'm sure the birth record is the correct one, but just wondering!

    Kind regards,

    Karl

  2. #2
    Brick wall demolition expert!
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    The 4th quarter fits with the September birth date as parents have 90 days to register a birth.

    With regards to the apparent discrepancy arising from his attestation papers, there could be all sorts of reasons for that.

    If I was you I would invest in the birth certificate to check that it was the right person.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megan Roberts View Post
    The 4th quarter fits with the September birth date as parents have 90 days to register a birth.

    With regards to the apparent discrepancy arising from his attestation papers, there could be all sorts of reasons for that.

    If I was you I would invest in the birth certificate to check that it was the right person.
    Sorry, Megan. but in England and Wales you've only ever had 42 days in which to register a birth.
    I don't know about Scotland, Ireland, and Eire.

    I would agree with you that the December quarter birth registration is almost certainly the correct one, but Karl is obviously forgetting to make one final check before sending for the certificate. Namely checking for the mother's maiden name on the GRO's own index.

    Karl, I'm assuming that you're ordering the certificate through the GRO, in which case after you've signed into the site instead of clicking 'order a certificate' click 'search the indexes'. Once you find the entry there's a link for ordering either a certified certificate in a fancy pink/red colour or a cheaper black-and-white PDF copy. It's easy-peasy as you don't have to bother filling in the details.

    Pam
    Vulcan XH558 - “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

  4. #4
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    I didn't know about the 90 days registration period, thanks! I had already bought it, though I have a 6 day wait for the PDF - It's definitely the correct record (unless his DoB was completely off)! Just wondering about the differences in dates.

    The address in the attestation is different to the other addresses I have in the census records, but the family moved a few times around the same general area in Liverpool as far as my research suggests.

    In the attestation, the address is 125 Hopwood Street, Kirkdale. They also lived at 1 Goodwood Street, 124 Roseberry Street, 19 Palmers Street, 40 Vesvious Street, and 13 Wentworth Street (this is where my great-grandfather died, and the last place his mother lived). Mind you, in the attestation, he didn't give his middle name - nor in his WWI medal card. Though my mother distinctly remembers seeing his medals, and one which said "for bravery in the field". After I checked the phrase online, I found this would be the Military Medal. When I looked into it (of course with lots of help from here) the crest on his helmet in the one picture I have of him, he was in the Liverpool 6th Regiment, and there was only one John Parry who got the MM in WW1 from the Liverpool Regiment.

    Overall, my great-grandfather had 7 siblings, Owen, Hugh, Mary E, Henry, Lewis W, Margeret, and Edward. In his marriage certificate he states his father was Owen Parry - a carter. His sister Mary Elizabeth Parry married a man called Thomas Henry Clark, who died in WW1, but she lived at the same address as my great-grandfather in 1939 (which listed her as a widow), which was also the same address listed in the obituary for my great-grandfather.

    I'm certain I've linked up the correct dots, but just wondering about the dates.

  5. #5
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    Ah so it's 45 days in England? I suppose that still matches his given DoB and the GRO index.

    I checked the maiden name - as far as my research suggests, John Henry Parry's parents were Owen Parry, and Mary Ellen Hughes. The record was the only one which made sense, where the mothers maiden name was Hughes.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by toaster View Post
    Ah so it's 45 days in England? I suppose that still matches his given DoB and the GRO index.

    I checked the maiden name - as far as my research suggests, John Henry Parry's parents were Owen Parry, and Mary Ellen Hughes. The record was the only one which made sense, where the mothers maiden name was Hughes.
    Watch my lips. Forty-TWO days.
    Vulcan XH558 - “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pam Downes View Post
    Watch my lips. Forty-TWO days.
    Ah 42, sorry - wine has got the better of me...

    Just realised it doesn't fit the 42 days, so I'm stumped.
    Last edited by toaster; 14-01-2021 at 12:19 PM. Reason: Alcohol

  8. #8
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    I mean the attestation - the 1939 Register and birth certificate still align okay with the 42 days.

  9. #9
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    Although the parents are supposed to register a birth within 42 days, the 1874 B&D Act allowed a registrar to register a birth for up to 12 months. Anything beyond that can only be done with the permission of the Registrar General.

  10. #10
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    That assumes the parents told the true date of birth. They may well have massaged the figures to fit.
    I have a gt gran born 21 June but not registered until 20 Nov. That is some 152 days. However, it was 1856 so well before the date where the authorities got sticky. pwholt

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