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Thread: Welsh Wills

  1. #1
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    Default Welsh Wills

    Peter Calver of Lost Cousins included the following snippet in his latest newsletter:

    "For some time it has been possible to browse Findmypast's large collection of Welsh probate records from 1544-1858, but now you can search all 700,000 records in seconds! "


    This collection is something that they seem to have acquired through Family Search, and basically it provides a form showing who the testator was, when the Will as written/ proved, which diocese in Wales, and crucially all the names mentioned in it, which is not something that you would normally be able to search for.

    What others may not know is that all Wills proved in Wales before 1858 are available to VIEW free of charge from the National Library of Wales website:

    https://www.library.wales/discover/l...esources/wills

    You can get copies but they have to be paid for.


    What this tip from Peter Calver has done, for me, is to leave me scratching my head wondering who the Mrs Anne Gambold was who in June 1709 was left 5 to buy a suit of mourning, by one Thomas Lloyd, which was the same amount as he left one brother, five times what he left another brother, and he was married as well! Unfortunately the Will gives no indication of their connection, and rather than clearing up a mystery has created a new one.

    The search criteria I had used on the Find my Past collection, was simply the surname "Gambold", which was my mother's maiden name.

  2. #2

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    Could there be a chance that Ann was a married sister?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lesley Robertson View Post
    Could there be a chance that Ann was a married sister?
    Interesting thought.

    There is definitely one Gambold chap who I know had children (so may have been married - must never assume must we?!), and I have no idea of the lady / ladies name(s) but he had a daughter called Anne. This would all have been around 1700.

    Again it comes down to find traces of people in parish registers, and Wills, and she is mentioned in an uncle's Will written in 1736ish in which she is married.

    So it would not be improbable for her mother to be an Anne.

    I have spent years piecing together the earlier years of this family, and much of it comes from the uncles will, which is very convoluted, but names countless relatives, and revealed that although he had children he was not married; hence my caution about his brother!

  4. #4

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    I have one line in my OPS where the daughters all (3) Called themselves Mrs and lived with men of the new surnames, but I have found no registered marriages. I’m nursing a suspicion that they were all nonconformists, and the register has not survived or is hiding somewhere...

    Of course, splitting and re-splitting denominations was a national sport in Scotland in the 18th century!

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