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  1. #1
    Newcomer to Brit-Gen
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    Aug 2020
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    Default Debility of Mouth

    I find this under 'Cause of Death' on a certificate dated 27 July 1861. It follows the words 'Pneumonia 10 days' which I presume to be the primary cause. This was a gent who had been retired from the Royal Marines on half pay at age 73. Given Victorian politeness and his social standing I am wondering if 'debility of mouth' implies more than it appears. Any suggestions anyone?

  2. #2

    Default

    A very, very warm welcome to Brit-gen.
    How clear/legible is the word "mouth"? Could it possibly be "month" - ie. the period he suffered the pneumonia?
    "dyfal donc a dyr y garreg"

  3. #3
    Super Moderator - Completely bonkers and will never change.
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    England
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    8,170

    Default

    Good thinking there, helachau.
    A possibility that would never had occurred to me in a month of Sundays.
    Though the certificate said he'd had pneumonia for 10 days he could have gradually been losing, say, his ability to walk unaided, for the previous month.

    Pam
    Vulcan XH558 - “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

  4. #4

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    Pam,
    The month of Sundays starts today!
    "dyfal donc a dyr y garreg"

  5. #5

    Default

    I was wondering about oral cancer, but that's probably a bit fiercer than "debility"...

  6. #6

    Default

    Where more than one condition contributes to death you tend to see "(1) ...... (2) ......" and so on.
    The poster hasn't described it as such - hence I ruled it out as a possible condition.
    "dyfal donc a dyr y garreg"

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