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  1. #1
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    Default Terminology - 1939 Census

    Hello,
    Would anyone be able to suggest what an "incapacitated married" man is please. The person concerned is documented on the 1939 Census as living at one address with his first wife and having an occupation of driver but he's also at another address (in the same borough)with his second wife where his occupation is described as "incapacitated married".

    There are corresponding marriage records - 20 years apart but I don't have the marriage certificates so cannot confirm 100% yet. So far it looks as if he was committing bigamy particularly as he continues to be listed on the electoral roll at the same addresses as both ladies during the rest of his life and there's a probate entry where he leaves his effects to his first wife and the address given is her address.

    There are numerous children - his first wife had 13 of them - but that's another conundrum on my list at the moment ...

    Any suggestions would be very greatfully received.
    Browneyes

  2. #2

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    Hello Browneyes you have confused me, which isn't hard these days.

    1939 Census - which country please?
    From what I have seen on my friend Google, it is a man who cannot work, through injury (most refers to mining).
    Hope that helps

  3. #3
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    Hi Neil,
    Thank you. It's the UK Census.
    You are going to think I'm completely mad now and i apologise profusely. I was working from the transcription of the census page but eventually this evening my pc managed to show the actual record (I'm not sure why it took so long to appear!). it was then that I realised that the transcriber had made a huge mistake - they had typed the occupation of the older person above my man (incapacitated) into my man's occupation on the transcription and had the occupation of my man's wife as bricklayer - heavy work which I thought was a bit unexpected but I went along with it!
    Blame it on being furloughed and not knowing what day or time it is...
    Thanks again though.
    Browneyes

  4. #4
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    Just goes to show how important it is to see the original entry, be it Census or BMD.

    Emeltom

  5. #5

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    To avoid confusion, it's worth pointing out that the 1939 is not a census. It's a register that was made at the beginning of WW2 to facilitate the issue of identity cards, ration books, etc. See HERE.

    It contains less information than the censuses, and the entries for those presumed to be alive are blacked out..

  6. #6
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    Can I just add to this, I think that I am right in saying that when the 1939 Register was transcribed the transcribers could only see 'their' columns so entries could easily be shunted up or down if one transcriber accidently missed a line. I've found this a couple of times in the lines that I am following, as Emelton said if possible you should always check with the original.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Margaret08 View Post
    Can I just add to this, I think that I am right in saying that when the 1939 Register was transcribed the transcribers could only see 'their' columns so entries could easily be shunted up or down if one transcriber accidently missed a line. I've found this a couple of times in the lines that I am following, as Emelton said if possible you should always check with the original.
    Yes that is correct,that said the original is shown on both Findmypast and Ancestry sites plus I believe others now and free at the National Archives when it opens to access again.
    Cheers
    Guy
    As we have gained from the past, we owe the future a debt, which we pay by sharing today.

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