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  1. #1
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    Default Divorce Records in the U.K.?

    I have a couple that appears to have split, based on the 1901 census and I also have them buried in different parts of the Norwood cemetery (one buried in 1902 and one in 1924). To me, this implies some form of separation happened. I'd like to find out more.

    Does the U.K. have some form of a register of divorces and/or legal separations or such? If so, can someone tell me more about how to access those sources?

  2. #2
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    You can search "England & Wales, Civil Divorce Records, 1858-1918" at Ancestry. It is said to be a pretty complete collection for that period.

    However divorce was not readily available and unless they were wealthy you are unlikely to find any legal record because there would not have been any legal process.

    See https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/...uides/divorce/

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    As one died in 1924, they should appear on the 1911 census.

    Why would it imply a separation? Maybe the original grave was only meant for one burial. The burials were 22 years apart. Do you have a photo of the grave stones, is there only one person buried in each grave? A relative of mine purchased a special deep grave (brick lined!) for three burials. I don't really know anything about burials or graves though, so not much help really.

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    Thank you, Peter. I'll check this out.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by suemalings View Post
    As one died in 1924, they should appear on the 1911 census.

    Why would it imply a separation? Maybe the original grave was only meant for one burial. The burials were 22 years apart. Do you have a photo of the grave stones, is there only one person buried in each grave? A relative of mine purchased a special deep grave (brick lined!) for three burials. I don't really know anything about burials or graves though, so not much help really.
    Sue;

    The situation doesn't prove there was a separation, but in their later years, they were living apart per the census records. It's just something I'm checking out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by suemalings View Post
    As one died in 1924, they should appear on the 1911 census.

    Why would it imply a separation? Maybe the original grave was only meant for one burial. The burials were 22 years apart. Do you have a photo of the grave stones, is there only one person buried in each grave? A relative of mine purchased a special deep grave (brick lined!) for three burials. I don't really know anything about burials or graves though, so not much help really.
    The one who died in 1902 is unlikely to be in the 1911 census, Sue.
    They were living at different addresses in 1901.

    I would agree that being buried in different graves doesn't imply a seperation.

    ADDED: Just remembered that in the forum section headed "Topics/threads, posts" (the one beneath this one of "General family history queries) there's a sub-forum headed'divorce'.
    Don't know if any of the posts in that section might be helpful.

    Pam
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    Pam;

    I looked for a "divorce forum" and couldn't find one. would have posted there had I found it. That said; Peter gave me the answer I needed.

    With respect to examining the possibility of a divorce or separation...

    As the husband and wife (with all the underage children) weren't living at the same place in 1901, there are at least a few possible explanations (other than visiting), each of which I should examine and not pre-judge. One is a possible divorce. If one looks at the grave records, they are actually buried in totally different areas of the cemetery. The two boys, who died after the father, are buried with him. The wife is buried alone. That's a bit odd, but not totally unusual. The probate records do seem to indicate that something odd has happened. The wife (who died last) is not indicated as the beneficiary of her husbands' estate. In this family, the wife has always been the beneficiary of a pre-deceased husband's estate.

  8. #8
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    The probate records do seem to indicate that something odd has happened. The wife (who died last) is not indicated as the beneficiary of her husbands' estate. In this family, the wife has always been the beneficiary of a pre-deceased husband's estate.
    Do you have a copy of the will or are you trying to guess what the will says from the probate calendar?

    The probate calendar contains absolutely no information at all about beneficiaries.

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    If they couldn't afford to purchase a "private" grave for several family burials, they would have gone to "common" or "public" graves where a number of unrelated people were buried together. Usually they died around the same time, which often explains why husband and wife are in separate graves and doesn't necessarily imply separation or divorce.

    If you look someone up on deceasedonline and find more than half a dozen people together, it was either a posh family plot or a common grave. You can see the number for free. Paying for the register scan or list of names will tell you whether they were related. Common graves, if they are marked at all, often have miniature headstones and you may see a plots with rows of them one behind the other like dominoes for several, but probably not all, of the people there.

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