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  1. #21
    Super Moderator christanel's Avatar
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    Have you looked for a remarriage of Ellen Parkin/Wallis?
    Christina
    Sometimes paranoia is just having all the facts.
    William Burroughs

  2. #22

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    Yes thanks, and I have sent away for the certificate as the only way to confirm more details. Could you divorce in 1850s England? I can't find a death notice for Ellen Wallis during 1853-1858. Bigamy perhaps and done a runner to NZ?

  3. #23
    Super Moderator christanel's Avatar
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    Yes divorce was available but only to those with money.

    Passage of the Divorce Reform Act, 1850–1857
    - to make full divorce more accessible to the upper middle class- and to make judicial separation and divorce inaccessible to the lower middle class and the poor.
    That caused critics to decry the hypocrisy of the proposed act.

    So bigamy was a choice that many made. Others just lived together whilst pretending to be married. Some married their new 'spouse' after/if their husband/wife died which is why some marriages occur years after the couple are seen together on censuses and the births of children to the second 'spouse.'
    Please come back and let us the the details on the certificate you have ordered.
    Christina
    Sometimes paranoia is just having all the facts.
    William Burroughs

  4. #24

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    I have now received the marriage certificate from GRO. Richard Wallis married Ellen Parkin at the General Baptist Chapel in Mansfield, Nottingham 1853. He was a 22 year old bachelor (confirms my theory he was born 1831) and his occupation is listed as Fellmonger. His father was (deceased) occupation Carpenter (the oldest son William, who was a timber merchant, would have inherited the father's tools). Richard was living in Church St, Mansfield and from the 1853 Directory of Nottingham I have confirmed there were 3 Fellmongeries in Nottingham at that stage. Ellen's father (also deceased) was a stonemason and her brother in law (Thomas Borthwell) was a witness. Ellen was living with her sister and brother in law Borthwells on 1851 census, and certificate states she was living in Hood/Wood St. I believe I now have the correct family connections. thanks everyone.

    If anyone could direct me to photos/links of the Baptist Chapel in Mansfield about 1853 that would be most welcome or names of fellmongeries in and around the market place (close to where he lived) I would be grateful.

    I have located an Ellen Wallis living as a servant at the Black Bull Inn on 1861 census (rounded up to 30 years old single person - she would have been 28)so can only assume she has not remarried or died at that stage. Well worth the money to buy the marriage certificate. thanks again everyone - any other useful advice would be most welcome.

  5. #25
    A fountain of knowledge
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyn Riley View Post

    If anyone could direct me to photos/links of the Baptist Chapel in Mansfield about 1853 that would be most welcome
    There seems to have been a few General Baptist Churches/Chapels, so you may need to pin down exactly which one.

    It may have been the Milton Street General Baptist Chapel. A photograph from 1853 is highly unlikely as photography was still rare, but if you click through from this 'overview' page there is a sketch. Whites Directory of 1853 lists the minister as The Rev. Geo. Alex. Syme.

    https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/manuscr...neystreet.aspx

    http://www.henly.f9.co.uk/history/NT...m/baptist.html

  6. #26

    Default General Baptist Chapel Mansfield

    Thanks Jo. Only way to pin it down exactly would be to find original marriage record in the relevant church archive? The Minister's name on the marriage certificate is hard to read but looks like John *rode. Not sure how to upload a copy of the certificate for someone to read the writing better than me. Can you attach documents in this forum?

    Lyn

    Quote Originally Posted by Jomot1 View Post
    There seems to have been a few General Baptist Churches/Chapels, so you may need to pin down exactly which one.

    It may have been the Milton Street General Baptist Chapel. A photograph from 1853 is highly unlikely as photography was still rare, but if you click through from this 'overview' page there is a sketch. Whites Directory of 1853 lists the minister as The Rev. Geo. Alex. Syme.

    https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/manuscr...neystreet.aspx

    http://www.henly.f9.co.uk/history/NT...m/baptist.html

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