Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Default Dating photographs

    The two photographs of this married woman are of an ancestor, born in 1851 in Cumberland and who married in 1873. They were taken in the studio of Scott & Son, Carlisle – no other information is visible on the front or back.

    Can anyone suggest when the photographs were taken please, and if there's any significance to the elaborate satin or silk 'scarf' embellishment sewn on the front of her dress?

    Thank-you.

    Russell





  2. #2

    Default

    Have you looked to see when Scott & Sone were in business? Look for trade directories.
    That's just the trim on the dress. Remember 2 things - fashions changed more slowly in rural areas, and women aged more rapidly...

  3. #3
    Reputation beyond repute
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    16,649

    Default

    I would say soon after being married and before having any children.

  4. #4

    Default

    The logo looks to be that of Benjamin Scott and Son.

    https://www.carlisleshistory.co.uk/page42.htm
    There's an entry for Scott B[enjamin] and Son, Devonshire Street.
    "dyfal donc a dyr y garreg"

  5. #5
    Name well known on Brit-Gen
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Posts
    4,863

    Default

    https://www.cartedevisite.co.uk/photo...otographers-s/

    What type of employment did your ancestor do? Quite an elaborate outfit. Give us a name let's see what we can find!

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lesley Robertson View Post
    Have you looked to see when Scott & Sone were in business? Look for trade directories.
    That's just the trim on the dress. Remember 2 things - fashions changed more slowly in rural areas, and women aged more rapidly...
    Hi Lesley

    Many thanks for your very quick response

    Scott & Son were in business for several decades (1855 to at least 1910), so unfortunately, this doesn't help to narrow-down the time-frame for when the photograph was taken.

    In my online research, I haven't encountered the embellishment that she has on her dress and so, wondered if it was indicative of an event, e.g. mourning, or if it was just a way of 'dressing-up' an otherwise plain outfit.

    I thought her dress in the style of the first half of the 1870s, which would fit with her age of early 20s, however, the severity of her hair style seems to be that of a decade or two earlier. She was from a Methodist family living on Alston Moor (the northern end of the Pennines), so perhaps these influences affected her attitude to 'fashion', although I do recognise that fashion in the provinces lagged behind that in the cities.

    Best regards

    Russell

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Goodey View Post
    I would say soon after being married and before having any children.
    Hi Peter

    Thanks for your very prompt response. I think that I'm coming around to that as well. She's wearing a wedding ring, so it was at least 1873. I thought her dress in the style of the first half of the 1870s, which would fit with her age of early 20s, however, the severity of her hair style seems to be that of a decade or two earlier. She was from a Methodist family living on Alston Moor (the northern end of the Pennines), so perhaps these influences affected her attitude to 'fashion', although I do recognise that fashion in the provinces lagged behind that in the cities.

    I was trying to reconcile what I know about her, with my understanding of Victorian dress and hair fashion. In my online research, I hadn't encountered the embellishment that she had on her dress, and wondered if that was indicative of en event, e.g. mourning, or if it was just a way of 'dressing-up' an otherwise plain outfit.

    Anyway, thanks again and best regards

    Russell

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by helachau View Post
    The logo looks to be that of Benjamin Scott and Son.

    https://www.carlisleshistory.co.uk/page42.htm
    There's an entry for Scott B[enjamin] and Son, Devonshire Street.
    Hi helchau

    Many thanks for your very prompt response. The link has proved very useful and I agree, it does seem to be Benjamin Scott and Son, in business from 1855 to at least 1910.

    Best regards

    Russell

  9. #9
    A fountain of knowledge pejay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    lincoln, lincolnshire
    Posts
    356

    Default

    I think about 1880. The style of dress,neck ruff and hair all seem to point to approx within that time frame.
    pejay

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by geneius View Post
    https://www.cartedevisite.co.uk/photo...otographers-s/

    What type of employment did your ancestor do? Quite an elaborate outfit. Give us a name let's see what we can find!
    Hi geneius

    Many thanks for your response

    She is Elizabeth Millican (née Watson), the wife of Wallace Millican, a farmer – census records are:

    • 1881 – wife of farm bailiff of 300 acres
    • 1891 – wife of farmer
    • 1901 – wife of a farmer (employer, not agricultural labourer)
    • 1911 – widow, living on private means
    She married in 1873 and her first child was born in 1874 – her last child was born in 1894.

    She's wearing a wedding ring, so it was at least 1873. I thought her dress in the style of the first half of the 1870s, which would fit with her age of early 20s, however, the severity of her hair-style seems to be that of a decade or two earlier. She was from a Methodist family living on Alston Moor (the northern end of the Pennines), so perhaps these influences affected her attitude to 'fashion', although I do recognise that fashion in the provinces lagged behind that in the cities.

    In my enquiry, I was trying to reconcile what I know about her, with my understanding of Victorian dress and hair fashion. In my online research, I hadn't encountered the embellishment that she had on her dress, and wondered if that was indicative of en event, e.g. mourning, or if it was just a way of 'dressing-up' an otherwise plain outfit.

    Best regards

    Russell

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Select a file: