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  1. #1
    David Eaves
    Guest

    Question Richard Eyves, recusant of Fishwick & Bradley

    Richard Eyves, died 1644, whilst fighting in the Civil Wars, according to the Catholic Record Society.He was buried in Preston churchyard December 1644.
    The Eyves family of Fishwick Hall, Preston, were recusant and delinquent, and a Catholic Gentry family, losing the family home to sequestration due to Richard's delinquency. Unlike most other Lancashire Catholic Gentry they never regained their property.
    I am attempting to locate where Richard met his demise. He was probably part of Prince Rupert's Lancashire Brigade, so may have died at Naseby, Marston Moor or at an incident between Royalists and Parliamentarians at Walton Bridge, which crossed the Ribble at Preston.
    Does anyone know of any royalist muster rolls for these battles or point me in a suitable direction.
    Thank you.
    David Eaves, Lancashire
    (Yes if you are wondering Eyves was how the name Eaves was recorded up to the end of the 17thC in Lancashire and I am a descendant of Richard's family line).

  2. #2

    Default

    I've done a bit of digging but nothing useful i'm afraid.
    The nearest thing availible to an "Army List" for the Royalist army as a whole was a list compiled in 1663 for claiments to the 60,000 granted by Charles II for the relief of "his truely loyal and indigent party" claims were usually submitted giving the name of their Colonel and in the case of junior officers their captain's name as well. Most officer listings in modern secondary works derive mainly from this source.
    Unfortunatly there is no Richard Eyves listed and he is also not mentioned in either of the post-restoration Royalist Martyrologies 'Royalist Martyrs' or 'A Catalogue of the Lords Knights and Gentlemen (of the Catholic Religion) that were slain in the late war'
    A burial date of December 1644 would rule out Naseby and is probably a bit late for Marston Moor unless his death was long drawn out from wounds received there. There is also not too many examples of bodies being brought home from long distances except amongst the aristocracy so if he died in action it was likely to have been fairly local. By December the Royalist presence in Lancashire had been reduced to a couple of isolated garrisons. Liverpool had surrendered in November but Eyves is not listed amongst the officers taken there. I can also find no mention of him amongst the garrisons of Lathom house or Greenhaugh Castle.
    Sorry I can't be more helpfull but I will keep my eyes open.
    Ivor Carr

  3. #3
    David Eaves
    Guest

    Exclamation Richard Eyves of Fishwick and Bradley

    Thank you ivor for your prompt reply and research. I have fairly exhausted my local libraries and the Lancs Record Office and am now cluthing at straws. If you uncover anything I would be most grateful for the information.
    Best wishes
    David Eaves.

  4. #4

    Default possiblity

    there was is museum on stanley st (london rd )also the fulwood barracks at
    fulwood rd all in preston just from memory
    jim s

  5. #5

    Default

    Hi David,

    I am doing my Fishwick Family tree they all come from Billinge, Lancs, originally from Preston though. I am back as far as 1725 only, not bad for only 6 month's work though. All my Fishwick's were farmers. My grandfather and his brother were Fruiterers and Vege merchants.

    In my many searches of all types of record's I have come across a few Eyves some Fishwick's christened their children with Eyves as a christian name.

    Thanks Ann

  6. #6
    Newcomer to Brit-Gen
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by David Eaves View Post
    Richard Eyves, died 1644, whilst fighting in the Civil Wars, according to the Catholic Record Society.He was buried in Preston churchyard December 1644.
    The Eyves family of Fishwick Hall, Preston, were recusant and delinquent, and a Catholic Gentry family, losing the family home to sequestration due to Richard's delinquency. Unlike most other Lancashire Catholic Gentry they never regained their property.
    I am attempting to locate where Richard met his demise. He was probably part of Prince Rupert's Lancashire Brigade, so may have died at Naseby, Marston Moor or at an incident between Royalists and Parliamentarians at Walton Bridge, which crossed the Ribble at Preston.
    Does anyone know of any royalist muster rolls for these battles or point me in a suitable direction.
    Thank you.
    David Eaves, Lancashire
    (Yes if you are wondering Eyves was how the name Eaves was recorded up to the end of the 17thC in Lancashire and I am a descendant of Richard's family line).
    I know this thread is old, but I've only just come across it whilst searching a few links.
    Sir Richard Eyves was my 10th great/grandfather. He was born around 1583 at Fishwick Hall, Fishwick, Lancashire. He died in 1644 of battle wounds received at the Battle of Marston Moor on Jul 2, 1644. He is, as it states in a few mentions, buried in Preston Churchyard, however, I don't know which churchyard.
    Richard was married to Jame Grimshaw (Grymshaw.) His father was Ralph Eyves and mother Anne Rishton (Rushton).

    Richard's son, Jonothan Eaves and daughter Elizabeth Eaves went to the Virginia colony in Chickacoan Indian Territory, Northumberland County VA in 1636. Hia sister, Elizabeth married Henry de Southworth of Samlesbury Hall. It is believed he died in 1644 and Elizabeth remarried. I don't have any details of Henry yet, except he was the sponsor for the group going to Virginia.

    His son, Richard Eaves born 1630 was my 9th g/grandfather who married Elizabeth Hough in 1659.

    The surname Eyves was commonly spelt this way in legal documents and was also d'Eywas before that, although I have no concrete evidence of such, but the lineage follows.

    I was an Eves prior to marriage. Eves/Standish/Morris are on my paternal side.

    There is another Richard Eyves b.1510 married to an Elizabeth Brewer also born 1510, they too are my g/grandparents. I have it that this Richard was also knighted, but up to now, no proof of this.

  7. #7

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    Welcome to the British Genealogy Forum. Have a look round, see what is where, and then why don't you tell us about your current research?

    Thank you for the information that you posted, it will no doubt prove useful to other researchers. However, the original poster is no longer a member (it says "guest" after his name), and will not, therefore, see your message. His account was deleted when he left, so we can't contact him to let him know of your answer.

  8. #8
    Newcomer to Brit-Gen
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lesley Robertson View Post
    Welcome to the British Genealogy Forum. Have a look round, see what is where, and then why don't you tell us about your current research?

    Thank you for the information that you posted, it will no doubt prove useful to other researchers. However, the original poster is no longer a member (it says "guest" after his name), and will not, therefore, see your message. His account was deleted when he left, so we can't contact him to let him know of your answer.
    Thank you for your response.

    That is sad he won't see the information, however, as you said, it could help someone else.

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