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  1. #11

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    Hi Tony, my original response to you was intended for Denhog "Dennis" so I should be apolagising to you, but many thanks for your prompt response anyway.Is there anymore imfo you can give me on this person Dennis.
    Secondly, in your response you say that you have seen all the newspaper articles referring to all the abuse etc. but you also referred to a tv programme about Father Ryan, do you have any more imfo on that as I would like to get a dvd of that programe.
    As a point of interest, the sexual and physical abuse at the home was ongoing even before my arrival there in 1959 and it has even come to light that there is a Jimmy saville connection, again you would have seen all those reports. If you have anymore imformation regarding the home The Shefford Scruffs as we are known would love to hear it, we are having a reunion at the Kings arms in Bedford on the 28th Sept 2013, if you are interested to hear more about life at the home ( i must warn you that some of the stories are horrific and disturbing) 2.00 pm to 7.00pm your welcome to join us. Regards
    Gordon

  2. #12

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    Hi Dennis, could you get in touch please, gordonDOTamcintoshATaolDOTcoDOTuk
    Last edited by christanel; 16-09-2013 at 10:45 AM. Reason: edit email address to deter spam.

  3. #13
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    Oct 2004
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    Hampshire. Near Basingstoke
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    Hi Gordon

    I do appreciate that your first post was addressed to Dennis so you have nothing to apologise to me about.

    The only contact I have had with Dennis is via this forum and is the exchange of posts which you've seen above. I think that I'm correct in saying that all private information about posters is protected as part of the security policies of the forum owners, as indeed it should be. The only way that could change is via the private messaging where posters could agree to exchange such details but that didn't happen in this case. Indeed there was no reason for it to because I was interested in a time 70 odd years before you and he were at the school.

    The only newspaper reports I've seen were the ones that came up when I followed your tip to Google the name of the school. Surprisingly none of that came up back in 2009 when I posted my first post. I'm afraid that I cannot remember details of the TV programme or what channel it was on, only that it was earlier this year. Even then I may have mis-remembered the names of the priests involved. All I do remember is that one of them had moved to Africa where he behaved in the same way and then I think to Australia. Could be wrong there.

    I hope that you and your fellow pupils are able to get some measure of recompense for your ordeals and is so doing at least reduce the burden that you've clearly carried around for so many years.
    "People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors. Edmund Burke

  4. #14
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    Gordon

    I see that you have asked Denhog to contact you. I had a quick look at his profile and saw that his last recorded activity on this forum was just a few days after his last post to me above in December 2009. So he is not an active member i.e. he may not see your post, although I guess that the automatic emailing service could alert him.

    best wishes

    Tony
    "People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors. Edmund Burke

  5. #15
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    Apr 2009
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    Just thought I would add to this from an Australian view,not being an orphan is very common for children raised in care here, The way in which society was arranged meant that if a child lost one parent though death or desertion or even long term illness, being put in care was the only option. This was a time of no support for a lone parent be they male or female, so a male left with children had no were to leave his children while he worked or for women here in Australia they were paid a 1/3 of a mans wage if they could find work so could not keep their children. My father died after ww2 and my mother had to put 4 children into care, she died in 2007 before I could find her, but I have been told she was never at peace and had no more children . There is a book here called 'Orphans of the Living' by Joanna Penglasse. I think the name of the book says it all. As far as the abuse in these institutions, I think the fact that there was no protection for these children attracted the worst of humanity.

    Glen

  6. #16
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    Hi Glen

    I was interested to read your reply because I'm sure that until very recently, the incidence of lone parents through higher mortality, particularly during childbirth, was far more common in the UK in the 19th century than would have been the case a 100 years later. I suspect that has changed again more recently when single parenthood has become more acceptable and financially possible due to changed moral values and welfare.

    In my direct line a father lost his wife to consumption after having 3 children who were all young still. He eventually re-married, as also seems to have been quite common in those days, no doubt because he needed someone to look after the kids. But from contemporary newspaper reports I discovered that the kids were probably left all day without food and resorted to theft for which they were caught and punished. The father was an evil, violent man for which he was also caught and punished but even so it cannot have been easy for him or for any lone parent in those hard times.

    Tony
    "People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors. Edmund Burke

  7. #17
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    Hi Tony: It's also important to take into account the impact of the 2 World Wars again this is from my reading in Australia. Many people of my age lost the fathers during the war or soon after the war and ended up in state care. For family research this can make things very difficult as siblings were not keep together ,but separated along the lines of age and sex,also often had their names change. My father was here in hospital at the end of the war,but was English he was from Itchen village Southampton so the lack of family on that side would also made things hard for my mother.

    Glen

  8. #18
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    Hi Glen

    I'm sure that the same was true in essence in the UK where of course wartime mortality was far higher in total numbers and the number of families affected likewise.

    The Itchen valley is just a few miles down the road from where I live and is a delightful area.

    Tony
    "People will not look forward to posterity who never look backward to their ancestors. Edmund Burke

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