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  1. #21

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    Hi,
    In chasing I came across service record of Service Number 328, Private Patrick McGuire, on 5th January 1824 at age 18 joins 94th Foot at Omagh sworn per Justice of the Peace Magistrate Daniel Wilson) Esq (signed Dan Wilson.
    Patrick Served 16 yrs incl offshore and was discharged in 1840, "returning home". The record of 16 pages comes from images (.jpg) of the archived original. Any relatives of Wilson will find his handwriting and signature.

    Any knowledge of Magistrate Wilson?

    Any clues in identifying if/who this Patrick married, and any offspring? His parents and birth?

    I have a friend (Wilson) who emigrated as a very young child from Omagh about 40 years ago, with parents and siblings. The information is her Wilson lot are a longstanding Omagh family.
    Last edited by McGene; 25-01-2017 at 1:33 PM. Reason: spelling

  2. #22
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    Daniel Wilson is listed in Pigots Directory for Omagh in 1824:

    http://www.failteromhat.com/pigot/0116.pdf


    he is no longer listed by 1846 and so presumably had died.
    ELWYN

  3. #23

    Default Thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwyn Soutter View Post
    Daniel Wilson is listed in Pigots Directory for Omagh in 1824:

    http://www.failteromhat.com/pigot/0116.pdf


    he is no longer listed by 1846 and so presumably had died.
    Thanks for the information and links to Pigot's Directory. Daniel Wilson could have died or retired.
    Are records available regarding training and/or registration of Justice(s) of the Peace? Presumably they were employed by the British Govt.?

    I have another question regarding Slater's Directory Omagh 1846, and will post it separately

  4. #24
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    There are 2 separate roles here. A Justice of the Peace (JP) is a respected local person, of good character, who has certain official duties and roles. They can authorize certain documents, eg in the past they authorised search warrants to the police and other law enforcement agencies. They also can sit in a Petty Sessions court. (A minor court). If they sit in a minor court they either sit alongside a Magistrate or they sit in threes and are advised on the law by the clerk of the court. They are lay, they don’t receive any payment and in the past they didn’t receive any training either, though that has changed nowadays for those who sit in court.

    In Ireland the practice of sitting alongside a magistrate (known for years as the Resident Magistrate, or RM) fizzled out and eventually the RM sat on his own. In England & Wales JPs do still sit in threes at minor courts. And they still sit in Scotland too, though I don’t know much about that system.

    So a JP had no training. They were respected citizens who were expected to use their judgment and common sense in assessing a person’s guilt. They also dealt with civil matters eg issuing drinks licenses to pubs and hotels. It was, and still is, seen as a way of involving local people in local justice. (You can only be employed in the area in which you live). The role would normally only take up one or two days a month and could be combined with other employment or duties.

    Magistrate is a slightly different role. They also sat in judgment at lower courts but were salaried, and full-time. Often a local big landowner, they were frequently former soldiers or civil servants, and were appointed by the Crown, in practice by the administration at Dublin Castle. In the early years they didn’t have any legal training, unless by accident. Nowadays that has changed and the magistrates (or District Judges as they are now called) are all legally qualified and trained for the role.

    You can read a bit more about it on this link:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resident_magistrate

    Daniel Wilson is described as an esq(uire) which means he was of independent means, and fits the role of a locally respected person. It isn’t entirely clear to me whether he was a JP and a lay magistrate, or whether a Resident Magistrate (probably the former, I suspect) but in either case, in the 1820s, he wouldn’t have had any legal training. As a JP he would have been appointed by the Lord Lieutenant of the county (ie the King or Queen’s representative in the county) and that was about it.

    You could check the National Archives in Dublin, especially those relating to the Dublin Castle Administration but I’d be surprised if you find anything on him, or anything more than a record that he had been appointed as a JP.
    ELWYN

  5. #25
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    My Great Grandfather was James Hall I don't know what part of Tyrone county he came from.He came to Australia vic .He married Emma Semple & had a family.I have hit a brick wall where is concerned.Coral Stone

  6. #26

    Thumbs up Thanks very much Elwyn

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwyn Soutter View Post
    There are 2 separate roles here. A Justice of the Peace (JP) is a respected local person, of good character, who has certain official duties and roles......

    You could check the National Archives in Dublin, especially those relating to the Dublin Castle Administration but Id be surprised if you find anything on him, or anything more than a record that he had been appointed as a JP.
    Thanks very much Elwyn for your comprehensive and informative post in reply.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by coralstone View Post
    My Great Grandfather was James Hall I don't know what part of Tyrone county he came from.He came to Australia vic .He married Emma Semple & had a family.I have hit a brick wall where is concerned.Coral Stone
    You probably know this already Emma Matilda SEMPLE wed James HALL 1872; Victoria Marriages #1531. Have you inspected his death certificate? It could give place of birth. Was he a brickmaker? What more do you know about James Hall?

  8. #28

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    Seeking information the Strabane Work House in County Tyrone - 4x great grandfather was Felix Lynch (and siblings Jane and Susan) - know they all 3 took the ENVOY ship to Canada in 1850. Want to find parents and path within this area to learn more about our family. Will be visiting area in September and hope to dig up more information beforehand. Thanks!

  9. #29
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    The records for Strabane Workhouse are kept in PRONI (the public record office) in Belfast. They are not on-line and a personal visit is required to view them. There are admission records though I don't know what years they cover. There are also the Board of Guardians minutes (i.e. the management meetings). They may be worth searching as well in case the family is mentioned there, especially if a group of people from the Workhouse left together.
    ELWYN

  10. #30

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    Thank you! Was hopeful there were some reliable online sources - but will definitely plan to stop here in September. Thanks!

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