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  1. #51

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    I dont believe Ingleramus De Gourlay was the first Gourlay in Scotland. Hugh De Gourlay of Hailes Castle and his family were. I believe they came over in 1066 with th normans and were granted lands in Lothian. They signed up for the ragman roll and lost at the battle of Bannockburn forfeiting all land. Although I cant prove it I believe they fled the area and their flight took them across the forth to Fife where they settled. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragman_Rolls https://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/...?PropID=PL_148

    if this throws a spanner in the works then am sorry, i think Ingleramus was born in Hailes Castle
    Last edited by r gourlay; 15-09-2014 at 4:59 PM. Reason: missed something

  2. #52
    Newcomer to Brit-Gen
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    Jan 2020
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    canada
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    Hi all,
    Being a Gourlay myself, I've found this site extremely interesting. Decades ago, I read 'Robert Gourlay - gadfly' and I recall the author said that Robert had researched his family history back to 1174 when King William returned to Scotland from exile in France. The author said that Robert had found that the Gourlay who accompanied him home was named "Ignoramus" de Gourlay.
    I've been dining out on that amusing anecdote for years now, but it is with some relief that I find our ancestor's name to be "Ingleramus". Although,I suppose that Ignoramus may have been a common name at one time.
    Ingleramus was granted lands in Fife, on the promontory overlooking the Firth of Forth, with a responsibility for watching out for enemy shipping.
    Scotland basically invaded Northern Ireland in the early 17th century, under the Plantation of Ulster policy. The British Crown wanted to protestantise Northern Ireland, so encouraged all those Scottish Presbyterians to go and take up land there.
    My ancestor John Gourlay (the Gourlay landscape, as you know, is littered with John's) emigrated to Canada from County Tyrone in 1831, to begin the Canadian branch of the family.
    Cheers.
    Gregory Gourlay

  3. #53
    Newcomer to Brit-Gen
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    Jul 2020
    Location
    Gold Coast
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    https://electricscotland {dot} com/w...cott01roge.pdf

    Interesting read for any Gourlay.
    Last edited by Lesley Robertson; 15-07-2020 at 8:39 AM. Reason: active url broken, in line with our T&C replace {dot} with . and paste into browser

  4. #54
    Newcomer to Brit-Gen
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    Jul 2020
    Location
    Gold Coast
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    2

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    https://
    electricscotland.com/webclans/dtog/memorialsofscott01roge.pdf

    Interesting read for any Gourlay.
    Last edited by Pam Downes; 22-07-2020 at 1:08 PM. Reason: Active url broken, in line with our T&C

  5. #55
    Newcomer to Brit-Gen
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    East Wemyss
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    Hi there my name is Derek Gourlay I live in East wemyss fife Scotland my 5th generation grandfather was Andrew Lundin Gourlay born in Kennoway in 1794 I am the last named Gourlay living in East Wemyss in 1911 there was 91 members of my famiky living within the 3 wemyss villages on the east coast of Scotland, I too believe we are all related to ingelramus however tracing back is very difficult I have found, to all other Gourlays out there , "Hello Family " stay safe and Good Health .

  6. #56
    Super Moderator - Completely bonkers and will never change.
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    England
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    8,374

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    Hello Derek,

    Welcome to British-Genealogy.

    I don't know if you noticed how old the entries in this thread are, but hopefully one or two of the posters are still around to receive notification of your post.

    Pam
    Vulcan XH558 - “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

  7. #57

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    I was about to add a quotation from Black's "Surnames of Scotland", the standard authority on such matters, when I realised that I have already done so in post #4. Obviously, for copyright reasons, I can't give the whole entry, just the earliest bit, but he traces the name from the Borders up to Angusand Stirlingshire.

    HOWEVER, it is important to consider that in the early days, before surnames became fixed, tenants and servants of someone rich and powerful (let us say, my old friend Kermit MacMuppet) frequently adopted the surname of their landlord. Thus the great Chief of Clan MacMuppet would have many people living around him who called themselves macMuppet without having a blood link. It was a sign of loyalty. Back then, people were also adopting the name of their occupation (eg Rauf Miller or Clerk) or their home village (eg Piegi de Kelso). Spelling variations crept in, records were lost (see my message #2), and definite links for families before the 16th century are extremely hard to make.

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