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  1. #1
    Super Moderator Sue Mackay's Avatar
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    Default Aided Immigration from Britain to South Africa

    There were two large Government sponsored emigration schemes to South Africa. The first was in 1820, when some 4,000 people were sent to the Eastern Cape. A complete list of the 1820 settlers can be found at
    www.
    genealogyworld.net/nash/index.html
    and there is also a website devoted to the 1820 settlers at
    www.
    1820settlers.com/
    All the originals letters of application for the 1820 settler scheme (whether or not they were accepted as settlers) have been transcribed from the originals at Kew and are on line at
    www.
    genealogyworld.net/settlers/correspondence/index.html

    The second major wave of Government aided immigration took place between 1857 and 1867. A complete listing is contained in "Aided Immigration from Britain to South Africa 1857-1867" by Esme Bull (Pretoria 1991).
    Sue Mackay
    Insanity is hereditary - you get it from your kids

  2. #2

    Default Look Up Please

    Could you look up in your book to see if John Brewer and/or James Brewer went to South Africa between 1857 and 1867 under this scheme. Thank you
    PippaKit

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Sue Mackay's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pippakit View Post
    Could you look up in your book to see if John Brewer and/or James Brewer went to South Africa between 1857 and 1867 under this scheme. Thank you
    PippaKit
    Only a Richard Brewer (30), blacksmith, listed in the main section. In the appendix they list some names from earlier sailings where passenger lists were published in the Government Gazette. There was a "John Brewer and wife, labourer" (no other information) who sailed on the Dalhousie from Plymouth, arriving on 23 June 1850.

    You just caught me - I'm off to South Africa in the morning!
    Sue Mackay
    Insanity is hereditary - you get it from your kids

  4. #4

    Default

    Thank you - that was my great great grandfather!

  5. #5

    Default Aided immigation

    Re I found your thread re the book

    ESME BULL: AIDED IMMIGRATION FROM BRITAIN TO SOUTH AFRICA 1857 - 1867

    If you still have it could you check out the 2 entries below.

    Naylor Page 660 Childrens Friend Society
    Naylor Page 749 Emigrant to New Zealand & Australia

    for any additional information.

    Many Thanks

    Linda

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Sue Mackay's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LynB View Post
    Re I found your thread re the book

    ESME BULL: AIDED IMMIGRATION FROM BRITAIN TO SOUTH AFRICA 1857 - 1867

    If you still have it could you check out the 2 entries below.

    Naylor Page 660 Childrens Friend Society
    Naylor Page 749 Emigrant to New Zealand & Australia

    for any additional information.

    Many Thanks

    Linda

    All it lists on p.660 is John Naylor, with a reference to the South African Commercial Advertiser 13:4:1842

    As it happens I have been transcribing stuff from the South African Commercial Advertiser, but I am nowhere near 1842 yet. However, as you are UK based, you may like to know that the National Archives at Kew have original copies of the newspaper. 1842 comes under CO53/6

    On p749 it says that John Naylor, Labourer, re-emigrated on the 'Maori', which departed for New Zealand on 26:10:1864 with 375 emigrants on board.
    Sue Mackay
    Insanity is hereditary - you get it from your kids

  7. #7

    Default Aided Immigration

    Thanks Sue,

    Unfortunately it isn't the Naylor I was looking for.

    Regards

    Linda

  8. #8
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    Default

    Look Up Please

    I am trying to find the emigration of

    William HUGHES and wife Amelia/Pamelia (HARTWELL) and at least a daughter Mary Anne from Gloucestershire to the Cape Colony in the late 1850's possibly on a boat called the Glentana

    Also possibly on the same boat according to legend is a Henry TAYLOR who may or may not be from Gloucestershire as well

    I am aware that Henry TAYLOR re emigrates now with wife Mary Anne HUGHES (having married her in the Cape c 1860 ) to New Zealand in 1864

    Any help appreciated

    R Palmer

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Sue Mackay's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rpalmer View Post
    William HUGHES and wife Amelia/Pamelia (HARTWELL) and at least a daughter Mary Anne from Gloucestershire to the Cape Colony in the late 1850's possibly on a boat called the Glentana
    The ship was called the Glentammer and arrived at the Cape on the 13th February 1850. It is a little to early for the scope of the main book but is mentioned in Annexure 3, where any earlier passenger lists have been taken from the Government Gazette in the Cape Archives (issue 21st Feb 1850). The only inormation from the printed passenger list is:
    William HUGHES, labourer, with wife and 5 children
    Henry TAYLOR, labourer

    I am aware that Henry TAYLOR re emigrates now with wife Mary Anne HUGHES (having married her in the Cape c 1860 ) to New Zealand in 1864
    Annexure 7 (Emigrants to New Zealand and Australia)
    Henry TAYLOR listed with wife Mary Ann and children Elizabeth, James and William.
    Re-emigrated on the 'Alfred' dep 27 September 1864 with 260 emigrants on board.
    Sue Mackay
    Insanity is hereditary - you get it from your kids

  10. #10
    Newcomer to Brit-Gen
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    Default

    Thank you for the information.

    It ties in beautifully with all I have subsequent to and prior to the emigration.

    The five children are a bit of a shock but this will enable me to finally find Mary Anne on the BDM's using some lateral thinking

    Is there any more info re the scheme ie an article that I can read about it in. I am a keen historian and would like to know more as background.

    Thanks again R Palmer

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