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neddy
18-11-2005, 7:29 PM
part 1 of 9
TAKEN FROM THE SHEFFIELD IRIS Oct 2 1800

Vienna court gazette Sept 6.
PROCLAMATION
of his imperial Majesty on the rupture of the armistice.

"His Imperial Apostolic Majesty, equally convinced of , and moved by the calamities of war,
has omitted no means in his power to procure a solid and durable peace for his kingdoms
and provinces,and all his faithful vassals and subjects, and by the recent measures he has taken,
has sufficiently proved his wish for peace; yet has the French Government unexpectedly,
and without any sufficient cause, declared the Armistice at an end, which had been concluded
with that view.
" Though from the repeated pacific assurances of the French Government, it is still to be hoped
that the renewal of hostilities may be avoided, his Majesty has nevertheless resolved to give an
incontravertible proof, both to his own subjects and to all Europe, how much he has their welfare
and protection at heart, by repairing in person with his Royal Brother the Archduke John to his
army in Germany. His Majesty at the same time remains unalterably disposed to accept,
with pleasure, any reasonable propositions and conditions of peace, and earnestly wishes
that he may soon have it in his power to announce to his faithful people a termination of the
calamities of war.
His Majesty the Emperor, and his brother the Archduke John, arrived at Saltzburgh on the
8th of September, with the army of which his Majesty intends to take the command.

This may be of interest as it gives a months worth of news if so I will carry on
it also gives accounts from Spain France and London
taken from The Iris or Sheffield Advertiser that I have in my possesion.

neddy
20-11-2005, 2:42 PM
part 2
Strasburgh Sept 12.
The hopes of peace are again revived.
The armistice has been further prolonged for six days. This report is thus explained.
There has arrived here a courier dispached by Moreau, with a letter from that General to the
Director of the Telegraph, instructing him to transmit immediately to Paris, the question which
he dictated to him, with the request of a speedy answer. The answer it is laid, was to consist of
the words " peace " or " war," according as the Chief Consul may consent or not to the demands of
Austria. It is added, that the answer was " war," and consequently that hostilities are expected to
recommence on the 7th inst. The courier waited here for the answer, and immediately set out with it
to Moreau.
A courier also arrived from General Moreau to General Lecourbe ; but Lecourbe was not here ; it
is supposed that the courier brought him the news of the prolongation of the armistice, and an
invitation to pass a few days longer here for the better re-establishment of his health.
The answer by the Telegraph to the dispaches of Moreau, respecting the last propositions of Austria,
is supposed not to be favourable. It arrived here on the 11th, in the afternoon, and Moreau's courier
immediatly set out with it.

neddy
20-11-2005, 2:44 PM
part 3
Hamburgh Sept 10.
A copy of the following Official Paper was published at Riga, by order of the Emperor of Russia,
on hearing of the arrival of Admiral Dickson's fleet in the Sound.
" According to the Consul and his Exellency Major-General Popow, I make known to your
Honourable Senate, that his Imperial Majesty, as well on account of the violent proceedings of
England against Denmark, as in consequence of an English fleet having passed the Sound,
by which the passage of it is blocked up, and the commerce of the Baltic may be subjected to
great inconvenience----------ordains, that as a security against any injury that the Russian trade may
sustain, and as long as the real intentions of the English Court may remain unknown, you will direct
all the property of the English to be placed in a state of sequestration, and that on no account,
without the permission of his Majesty, you suffer the same to be transported out of Russia ; that
however no part of their property is to be taken away from them, nor they themselves disturbed in
the management of their affairs, of which you will take special care.
" Given at the Council-House at Riga. the 29th Aug.1800. " Shwartz, Sec. "

neddy
21-11-2005, 12:13 PM
part 4
London Sept 26
The Hamburg Mail due on Wednesday arrived this morning.
It is chiefly interesting, as it's contents tend to dissipate any doubt that may have been entertained
respecting the prolongation of the armistace. Some letters state, that unless presented by the signing
of peace, hostilities would recommence about the 17th ; while it appears, from others, that some of
the German journalists understood that the armistice was prolonged to the 19th instance whatever difference
may be observed-(hole in paper word missing)-between them in this respect, it would seem certain that those
writers all concur in assuring us that the armistice has been prolonged.
The Emporer was still with his army at the date of the last arrivals ; and it is reported in a letter from Frankfort,
that Bonaparte will probably join the army of Moreau.
A general rising will take place immediately in Hungary. Lieutenant Field Marshall Kospoth is charged with
the organisation of it.---The Archduke Palatine has repaired to Pest for the same purpose.

neddy
22-11-2005, 1:28 PM
part 5
London Sept 27
We are sorry to find, by the latest intelligence from Spain, that the disorder supposed to be the plague
continues to rage with the greatest violence in Cadiz. Letters from Xerez dated the 5th inst. state that
the deaths between 25th of August and the 1st of September amounted to nearly 1,200.
Numbers had died at Port St. Marys, and St. Lucar. Alarming symptoms had also appeared at Seville,
and the disease was particularly violent in Triana, and the suburbs.
All commnication was cut off between Cadiz and the places adjacent on the continent.
When we recollect the number of troops that are now in Gibralter and Minorca, we cannot be without apprehension
lest this terrible disorder should reach those places.
We doubt not, however that every precaution will be taken to stop the progress of the pestilence.
A Lisbon Mail arrived this day. The intelligence of this conveyance is not of striking importance.
An invasion of Portugal by the Spaniards continues to be talked of, but it appears that the Portuguese Government
is determined to make the most effectual resistance of which it may be capable. Hopes of success are
confidently entertained in Lisbon.
We are still however unable to discover in the procedings of the Cabinet of Madrid any thing really decisive.
The reported invasion is therefore doubtful.
It is true, letters from Spain state that several Spanish corps have lately marched through Seville for
the frontiers of Portugal. The regiments of Hibernia and Naples forming part of the garrison of Cadiz,
are in there route to the same destination, These demonstrations are dobtless warlike.
Letters recieved from Officers attached to Sir James Pulteney state, that Sir Ralph Abercromby, with
the forces under his command, was expected to join Sir James about the mouth of the Straits.
If such a junction take place, Cadiz is likely to be the point of attack ; but this city is too strong to be
carried by a -coup de main-, and it would be quite romantic to expect to succeed against it by
regular siege.

neddy
22-11-2005, 1:32 PM
part 6
London September 28
The Mails of Friday possessed us of letters from the combined British and Tukish fleet,
off Alexandria, dated the 9th July. Sir Sidney Smith had sent Lieutenant Wright , of Le Tigre, to Cairo,
charged with dispaches to General Menou, and the Allies waited with solicitude the answer.
The Grand Vizier was encamped with about 30,000 men at Jaffa, and was actively engaged in
preparations to advance against the enemy, should the mission of Mr. Wright fail to induce them
to evacuate Egypt.
It was yesterday currently reported, that Government had consented to the Maritime Armistice
proposed by France, on condition that the Spanish squadron should be sufferered to return toCadiz,
and that the Brest fleet should be dismantled.
It was added , that a Messenger with dispatches to this effect had been sent for France on the
breaking up of the Cabinet on Friday ; and it is said that the advance of one per cent, which then took place
in the price of Stocks resulted from this resolve.
It is with concern we state that the Cormorant sloop of war, charged with dispatches to Sir Sidney Smith,
was lost off Rosetta early in July. The whole of the crew , and a Kings Messenger who was on board,
reached in safety the Egyptian coast, where, however they are detained as prisoners of war.
Sir R. Bickerton, who commands four sail of the line off Cadiz, has recieved intimation of a large
Spanish convoy being daily expected at that port ;--the Spaniards, it was believed were equipping a
squadron for its protection.
An affair occurred in China immediately previous to the sailing of the lately arrived fleet, which
threatened to interrupt our intercourse with that country. The Providence schooner had lost two cables,
and a Chinese was discovered in the act of cutting a third--he was fired at and killed--a general alarm
was excited on shore , and a suspension to all commerce,( the consequence of a like occurance some
years since ) was threatened and expected. Captain Dilkes of the Madras the Commanding Officer
immediately went on shore for the purpose of amicable adjustment, and fortunately succeeded, although
we are given to understand he was hustled out of the courthouse, and grossly insulted by the populace.

neddy
24-11-2005, 5:40 PM
part 7
France Paris September 23
The Minister of the Interior communicated the following address to the citizens assembled in the
Temple of Mars, to celebrate the festival of the Republic :-- The Chief Consul to the Public Functionaries
deputed by the departments.
" The preliminaries of peace were signed at Paris on the 9th Thermidor, between Citizen Talleyrand,
Minister for Foriegn Affairs, and the Count de St. Julien. Twenty four hours after they were ratified by
the Consuls.
" Citizen Duroc was appointed to carry them to Vienna. The intrigues of the faction hostile to peace,
which seems still there to enjoy some credit, prevailed upon the Emperor to refuse to ratify them.
The reason given for this refusal was a note from the King of England, requesting that his Envoys
should be admitted to the congress at Luneville, in conjunction with the Plenipotentiaries of the Emperor.
" Government then found it necessary to break the armistice, left the rest of the Autumn should be lost in
fruitless conferences.
" General Moreau received orders to communicate to the Austrian Commander in Chief the preliminaries, as
they had been printed in the official journal, and to inform him, that, if they were not ratified in twenty-four hours,
or, if his Majesty the Emperor, wishing for ulterior explanations, would not deliver up to the French army the three
places of Ulm, Ingoldstadt, and Philipsburgh, hostilities would be immediately resumed.
" Government likewise notified to the King of England, that it saw no objection to admitting his Envoys to the
Congress of Luneville, if he consents to a truce at sea, from which France would derive the same benefit as the
Emperor derives from the continuation of the truce on the Continent.
" At this moment Government recieves intelligence by the Telegraph, that his Majesty the Emperor had repaired in
person to his army, on the Inn ; that he had consented to deliver the three places of Ulm, Ingoldsadt, and Philipsburgh
which are now occupied by the troops of the Republic ; and that M. de Lehbrach, furnished with the necessary powers
from his Majesty the Emperor, is at head quarters at Altoesing with orders to proceed immediately to Luneville.
" The difficulties naturally presented by the conditions of a maritime truce will still occasion some delay ; but if
the two Governments do not agree upon the conditionsof the said truce, then France and his Imperial Majesty
will treat for a seperate peace upon the basis of the preliminaries ; and if, which there is little reason to suppose,
the party of England should succeed in influencing the Minister of the Court of Vienna, the troops of the Republns, would not deliver up to the French army the three
places of Ulm, Ingoldstadt, and Philipsburgh, hostilities would be immediately resumed.
" Government likewise notified to the King of England, that it saw no objection to admitting his Envoys to the
Congress of Luneville, if he consents to a truce at sea, from which France would derive the same benefit as the
Emperor derives from the continuation of the truce on the Continent.
" At this moment Government recieves intelligence by the Telegraph, that his Majesty the Emperor had repaired in
person to his army, on the Inn ; that he had consented to deliver the three places of Ulm, Ingoldsadt, and Philipsburgh
which are now occupied by the troops of the Republic ; and that M. de Lehbrach, furnished with the necessary powers
from his Majesty the Emperor, is at head quarters at Altoesing with orders to proceed immediately to Luneville.
" The difficulties naturally presented by the conditions of a maritime truce will still occasion some delay ; but if
the two Governments do not agree upon the conditionsof the said truce, then France and his Imperial Majesty
will treat for a seperate peace upon the basis of the preliminaries ; and if, which there is little reason to suppose,
the party of England should succeed in influencing the Minister of the Court of Vienna, the troops of the Republns, would not deliver up to the French army the three
places of Ulm, Ingoldstadt, and Philipsburgh, hostilities would be immediately resumed.
" Government likewise notified to the King of England, that it saw no objection to admitting his Envoys to the
Congress of Luneville, if he consents to a truce at sea, from which France would derive the same benefit as the
Emperor derives from the continuation of the truce on the Continent.
" At this moment Government recieves intelligence by the Telegraph, that his Majesty the Emperor had repaired in
person to his army, on the Inn ; that he had consented to deliver the three places of Ulm, Ingoldsadt, and Philipsburgh
which are now occupied by the troops of the Republic ; and that M. de Lehbrach, furnished with the necessary powers
from his Majesty the Emperor, is at head quarters at Altoesing with orders to proceed immediately to Luneville.
" The difficulties naturally presented by the conditions of a maritime truce will still occasion some delay ; but if
the two Governments do not agree upon the conditionsof the said truce, then France and his Imperial Majesty
will treat for a seperate peace upon the basis of the preliminaries ; and if, which there is little reason to suppose,
the party of England should succeed in influencing the Minister of the Court of Vienna, the troops of the Republns, would not deliver up to the French army the three
places of Ulm, Ingoldstadt, and Philipsburgh, hostilities would be immediately resumed.
" Government likewise notified to the King of England, that it saw no objection to admitting his Envoys to the
Congress of Luneville, if he consents to a truce at sea, from which France would derive the same benefit as the
Emperor derives from the continuation of the truce on the Continent.
" At this moment Government recieves intelligence by the Telegraph, that his Majesty the Emperor had repaired in
person to his army, on the Inn ; that he had consented to deliver the three places of Ulm, Ingoldsadt, and Philipsburgh
which are now occupied by the troops of the Republic ; and that M. de Lehbrach, furnished with the necessary powers
from his Majesty the Emperor, is at head quarters at Altoesing with orders to proceed immediately to Luneville.
" The difficulties naturally presented by the conditions of a maritime truce will still occasion some delay ; but if
the two Governments do not agree upon the conditionsof the said truce, then France and his Imperial Majesty
will treat for a seperate peace upon the basis of the preliminaries ; and if, which there is little reason to suppose,
the party of England should succeed in influencing the Minister of the Court of Vienna, the troops of the Republic,
disregarding the snow and the rigour of the seasons, will carry on the war with invincible bravery during this winter,
and leave no time to the enemy to raise new armies.
" Thus the principles of the French Government are-----extreme moderation in the conditions ; but firm resolution to
restore peace speedily to the Continent.
" The most vigourous measures are taken to second, in this essential object, the will of the people of France.
" Such is the only secret in the politics of her Government.

neddy
05-12-2005, 4:37 PM
part 8
France September 24
Telegraphic Bulletin from Strasburgh,----Gen. Moreau, Commander in Chief of the Army of the Rhine, to
General Bonaparte, Chief Consul of the Republic.
Headquarters, 3rd complementary Day.
" I have concluded a new Armistace. The three fortresses of Ulm, Ingoldstadt and Philipsburgh are to be delivered up
within five days, and evacuated within ten.
( a true copy ) ( signed ) CHAPPE. "
The above was recieved yesterday.
---------------------
The translation of the body of Turenne took place on the 22 inst. At 2 o clock the Ministers of the Interior and of War
went to the Museum, accompanied by a great number of General Officers, where they found Citizens Desfontains and
Lenoir, to whom the body of Turenne had been intrusted. It was placed in the middle of the Hall, and before him was placed
the sword he had carried on the day of his death, Citizen Lenoir, in giving up his body to the Minister of the Interior,
made a speech, to which the latter made a short reply, after which the procession began its march.
The body was placed upon a triumphal car decorated with much care, and drawn by four white horses, the pied horse
like that on which Turenne rode, was led before the car by a negro, dressed like the one that belonged to Turenne.
Several old warriors surrounded the car.
Generals Berruyer, Abbeville, Vetal and Estourmal, the latter of whom is a relation of Turenne's, marched at the four corners.
The procession marched in the greatest order to the Hotel of Invalids, where some solemn military music was performed,
after which the Minister at War pronounced a suitable discourse. The body of Turenne was deposited in the tomb in
which it was enclosed at St. Denis.

neddy
05-12-2005, 4:38 PM
part 9
London September 29
The intelligence by Paris Journals to the 26th instant, recieved yesterday, surpasses in importance even all those
interesting communications from that Capital, of which the last twelve months have been abundantly productive.
These Journals were brought to Dover, as we understand, by a vessel under a flag of truce, charged by the
Consulate with despatches from Talleyrand, the French Minister for Foreign Affairs, to Lord Grenville, his Majesty's
Secretary of State in that department.
The principal divisions of the subject which the Paris Papers give to discussion are these, the Festival of the Anniversary
of the Republic----the Peace of the Empire and a Re-negociation for Peace between Great Britain and France.
Luneville, where the Plenipotentiaries of the Emperor and the French Republic are to hold their Congress, is a town
in Lorraine, in the department of De La Muirte. It is situated Eastward, about 190 miles from Paris.
A considerable part of Lord St. Vincent's fleet has come into Torbay. When the naval preparations of the French are
considered, this intelligence will be regarded as very important. Our correspondent does not assign any reason for
the return of those vessels.
Have they been relieved by other ships of war ? Have they been driven off Brest by stress of weather ? or has
the progress of the negociation respecting an armistace by sea rendered the strict blockade of the combined fleet
less necessary.
end
any mistakes to be excused as its not easy to read.