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Megan Roberts
04-09-2020, 8:34 AM
Whilst doing some convict research I came across an the transcript of which is below. It is undated, and it does not say to whom it is addressed. So that is my question - who do people think it was addressed to? I have my suspicions based on (a) what is in the letter, and (b) my other knowledge the early life of one of the people who is name. At a guess I would say the letter say written in 1840.



Royal Highness
The petition of Richard Jones native of Carnarvon aged twenty six and late servant to Mr Bignell at the Penabrin Arms Bangor in the County of Carnarvon in the Principality of Wales.
Humbly Sheweth
That your petitioner was servant to the said Mr Bignell when your Royal Highness in company with her present Majesty then heir presumptive to the Crown of these realms when you were pleased to pay your Royal visit to the most noble Marquis of Anglesea which to the best of my recollection was in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty four.
When your petitioner had the honour and good fortune and was specially recommended as coachman to your Royal Highness and her present Majesty during your stay or properly speaking during your Royal will and pleasure and I flatter myself I discharge those duties incumbent uppon me much to you Royal Highnesses satisfaction insomuch that at your departure your Royal Highness in a very condescending manner was pleased to inform me after receiving there marks of kindness which has distinguished your Royal Highnesses character through every period of your life being satisfied with our conduct as servants and in the event of our future lives should any thing turn out to our disadvantage in the shape of misfortune that by letting your Royal Highness know your should be ready and willing to use that influence in our behalf to relieve our sufferings and remove the [dangers].
Your petitioner comes now to the melancholy catastrophe which [****] his feelings to relate and which no doubt will throw a lasting stigma on the future part of his life, long destitute of employment in the year previous to his conviction with a wife and two children looking to him for bread and having none to give them and my parish having ultimately [refused ***** ] any assistance there being no other alternative beg or steal, to beg was in vain he was detected in an act of burglary and convicted at Carnarvon on the first of January one thousand eight hundred and forty and sentenced to seven years transportation which he now enduring on board the hulk stationed at Woolwich Arsenal. Your petitioner in the most humble and contrite manner solicits your Royal Highness interference in his present humble and low condition using your influence which have be made manifest to the amelioration of his sufferings. If then your Royal Highness shall find it compatable with your dignity to lay this my petition before the Queens most Excelent Majesty for a mitigation of that sentence which I am now undergoing and should it appear in the sequill that I have attained by your Royal Highnesses interference to a portion of that clemency peculiar and characteristic of the most illustrious house of Brunswick, your petitioner shall never love sight or recollection of the great benefit he has thus received and on returning to social life will never cease to pray for you welfare which I remain in duty bound your Royal Highness most obedient devoted and very humble servant

Lesley Robertson
04-09-2020, 8:51 AM
I was going to say Prince Albert because of the several mentions of Her Majesty, but he mentions HM as being the then “heir presumptive”.. Princess Victoria was being taken on tours of the country by her mother in the early 1830s and Prince A did visit in 1836, but a quick search hasn’t turned up any mentions of him being taken on one of those trips... Other princes were apparently also being trotted out for Victoria to view, but I don’t think that they’d be in a position to help a British family much later.

pwholt
04-09-2020, 9:32 AM
Any significance to mention of the House of Brunswick? Most likely a male addressee as women had little influence, at least directly. pwholt.

Megan Roberts
04-09-2020, 10:05 AM
Any significance to mention of the House of Brunswick? Most likely a male addressee as women had little influence, at least directly. pwholt.

Looking at this page from Wikipedia it suggests that it wasn't the House of Hanover before Victoria changed it to the Saxe-Coburg but the "House of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Hanover"!


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Hanover


My theory is that given that Victoria was controlled by her mother under the "Kensington System" until she came to the throne, is that it might well have been addressed to her mother, the Duchess of Kent (Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld).

The letter was passed off to the Home Office who refused any mitigation, but he was not transported and was discharged by "pardon" from the hulk in late 1843, which was not uncommon but perhaps a little earlier than others.

wimsey
04-09-2020, 11:35 AM
Victoria and her mother were in Wales in 1832

https://welshhat.wordpress.com/chronological-survey/1830s/1832-visit-by-princess-victoria/

apparently Victoria first started writing her diary on this trip

Megan Roberts
04-09-2020, 1:16 PM
Wimsey - you are a star!:clap::clap::clap:

Thanks!

gilian rowland
04-09-2020, 2:01 PM
MEGAN
I admit I have only skimmed through your posting so have not "absorbed" the content yet but I did a quick google search and William IV "was officially married to Princess Caroline of Brunswick,"" He died on 26 June 1830. His only child, Princess Charlotte had died in childbirth in 1817, so the crown passed to George's brother who became William IV."

"Why did Victoria succeed William IV?Her father died shortly after her birth and she became heir to the throne because the three uncles who were ahead of her in the succession - George IV, Frederick Duke of York, and William IV - had no legitimate children who survived. ... On William IV's death in 1837, she became Queen at the age of 18."

"Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (the fourth son of King George III), and Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. After both the Duke and his father died in 1820, she was raised under close supervision by her mother and her comptroller, John Conroy. She inherited the throne aged 18 after her father's three elder brothers died without surviving legitimate issue."

This might well not help you but at least the thought was there! And to think I have O level history! Jill

helachau
04-09-2020, 2:52 PM
The North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser, 28 Aug 1832, has an article about the Princess Victoria and the Duchess of Kent going to Plas Newydd to reside for the remainder of the week "... in order to accommodate Mrs Bicknell by leaving the Bulkeley Arms, Beaumaris and Penrhyn Arms, Bangor, open for the convenience of the multitude of fashionables who now resort from all quarters to the Eisteddfod ..."

Did Richard Jones mean "Bicknell" and "Penrhyn" in his appeal - yet to spot a Penabryn Arms?

Megan Roberts
04-09-2020, 3:27 PM
The North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser, 28 Aug 1832, has an article about the Princess Victoria and the Duchess of Kent going to Plas Newydd to reside for the remainder of the week "... in order to accommodate Mrs Bicknell by leaving the Bulkeley Arms, Beaumaris and Penrhyn Arms, Bangor, open for the convenience of the multitude of fashionables who now resort from all quarters to the Eisteddfod ..."

Did Richard Jones mean "Bicknell" and "Penrhyn" in his appeal - yet to spot a Penabryn Arms?

It's quite possible - as you can see from the transcription some of the spellings as atrocious and I do wonder whether he could write and if couldn't then probably he told his tale to someone who wrote it down for him, and as that would have been in Woolwich then there could have been issues about accents and understanding names like Penrhyrn.

helachau
04-09-2020, 4:27 PM
Agreed.
When the Penrhyn Arms was opened in 1824 by Thomas B Bicknell an advert in the North Wales Gazette concluded
"N.B. Post Chaises, excellent Horses and careful Drivers, on the shortest notice"

Ironically, Thomas died in the June preceding the Royal visit when the lynch pin of the 4 wheel phaeton he was travelling in gave way. His wife was at the reins, he being too weak to drive as he was recovering from a "severe indisposition".

I appears they had both the Penrhyn and Bulkeley Arms, Mrs Bicknell hosting a dinner at the Bulkeley for the Royal pair.

Megan Roberts
04-09-2020, 5:34 PM
Helachau

Your are a veritable fereter out of information.

So the letter writer couldn't even get the gender of the erstwhile employer correct! Perhaps that is why he was unemployed and turning to crime!