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sue2white
18-10-2009, 8:34 AM
Yesterday, amongst the Spam emails that were moved to my Anti-Spam inbox, I noticed and email with sent from my own email address to me.
It was indeed spam -trying to sell me some computer software. But how on earth did it have my own email address as sender.
Obviously, I checked my sent box, to make sure it hadn't originated from my computer and it hadn't. But is this a bit of a coincidence that my address has been phished and then used to send a mail back to me??
Scary stuff.

Sue

http://freesmileyface.net/smiley/Signs/dd-spam.gif (http://freesmileyface.net)

Procat
18-10-2009, 8:44 AM
I have had that in the past. Was a bit spooky. At the time my ISP was being targeted by spammers. No idea of the mechanics of it though.

Peter Goodey
18-10-2009, 9:01 AM
Ten of the last twelve junk mails I received have got my own email address shown as sender

sue2white
18-10-2009, 10:16 AM
Ten of the last twelve junk mails I received have got my own email address shown as sender

What's going on?????

Sue



http://freesmileyface.net/smiley/Computer/computer-11.gif (http://freesmileyface.net/Free-Computer-Smileys.html)

David Benson
18-10-2009, 10:24 AM
Don't open any of them - they may lead you to download a virus or trojan.

We get hundreds a month, some showing with added letters in the address - often a z or n plus various other combinations of letters.

I think it's called 'spoofing' the address.

MarkJ
18-10-2009, 12:08 PM
As David says, it is called spoofing. Very easy to do. I suspect the spammers do this to make people curious. One of my email accounts has probably 30% of spam which I allegedly sent myself.... ;)

They get email addresses from many sources (I have mentioned that before on the forum I think - but if not, I am happy to explain ;) ), and use programs to send out the mails (nearly always from compromised computers). The program is set in these cases to pick a recipient address (from a list or whatever) and then use that name as the sender too.

Davids advice re not opening the mails is sound.
Depending on your mail program, you can examine the "headers" for any email - which shows you lots of technical information. But in there, it will show the actual senders details.

Unless you know what you are doing - and have a specific reason for opening the spam mails - it is best to simply delete them.

Mark

Sandyhall
18-10-2009, 1:47 PM
Change all your passwords as well.

This last lot of Phishing that has been in the news a couple of weeks ago had my name on the list, they sent spam e-mails to every one in my contacts list.
|nutkick| no I'm not violent but I want to be.

Sandy

JAP1
18-10-2009, 2:46 PM
sue2qhite,

Ignore it!

That particularly body isnot connected with me. seems not to be on a moither in birth.
Oh, Sir, that it's just the greatest of great news!
But if I were you, I would be terried!
We have a WIlllim Arumstrng
bbnm;JAPJJ

J

JAP1
18-10-2009, 2:49 PM
Now are they playing with B-G.

That last post is definitely not mine.

???

Weird.

JAP

Carmy
18-10-2009, 3:33 PM
During the last couple of weeks there have been strong warning out about several email account providers being compromised. We were told to make sure we changed our passwords.

In your email Options, you have the strongest security settings in place, right? Don't open mail from an unknonwn contact. Right click on it and check Properties. If anything doesn't seem right, delete the mail without opening.

Before you sign out of your browser, you run Options, right? You delete everything, right? Then you run a program like C Cleaner to get rid of the stuff your computer gathered without your knowledge during your recent activity on the Internet.

Most importantly, you update your virus program every day before you browse.

Nothing can make your computer 100% free of attack, but the weakest link is the operator. Scan everything you download.

Be careful of where you browse and never leave a site and forget to log out.

JAP1
18-10-2009, 4:00 PM
Jap1, do you use a wireless connection?

Absolutely not!

My connexions are, like moi, very elderly!!

I suspect that problems usually emanate from other people's address books which have one's address in them.

I'm away now (too late here!) but if there are any problems I'll call in younger son (currently - amazingly - living where I do). Between him and elder son (lives overseas as both have for yonks) - both computer boffins - they should be able to fix any problems. Though I do remember the old proverb about the cobbler's children having no shoes ... I guess it probably applies equally to the cobbler's aged parent ...

All the best,

JAP

sue2white
18-10-2009, 10:18 PM
Ummm!

I have run virus scan & adware. Nothing found.
Tried to change my email password and it was having none of it. But would still let me in with my old one.

Worrying!

Sue

sue2white
18-10-2009, 10:22 PM
Even stranger. It has now accepted my new password, but wouldn't five minutes ago.

Well, at least it is changed!!

Sue:confused:

MarkJ
18-10-2009, 10:36 PM
The receiving of emails with your name in the "From" address doesn't mean you have a problem Sue. It is - as David and I mentioned earlier in this thread - just a common spoofing technique.

The stealing of passwords for email accounts mentioned by Sandy was for accounts with online email services - hotmail, gmail etc. It affected some people who had been conned by phishing mails into giving out their passwords. Most people are unaffected - but if you use one of those services, it may be worth changing your passwords. It doesn't have any connection with the email "From" address spoofing, which is a very common practice these days.

Mark

Carmy
19-10-2009, 1:17 AM
One warning about email also mentioned using the same password for sites such as this one. Apparently, it's a no-no. Make them different.

sue2white
19-10-2009, 6:17 AM
The receiving of emails with your name in the "From" address doesn't mean you have a problem Sue. It is - as David and I mentioned earlier in this thread - just a common spoofing technique

Thank you Mark. That makes me feel a whole lot easier. My emails go through to Outlook express, but I do access my ISP webmail when I'm at work. Although it isn't one that has been mentioned.

But my password is changed anyway.


One warning about email also mentioned using the same password for sites such as this one. Apparently, it's a no-no. Make them different.

I do keep them different....but it's a job remembering them. I don't like to set the option to 'remember' password, so often have to have a reminder for those sites I don't use too often!!

Sue:)

MarkJ
19-10-2009, 7:55 AM
Despite the oft quoted tales about not writing down passwords, many tech folks - myself included - think it is better to have complex passwords and write them down in a notebook or something than to have very simple ones because they are easy to remember.
A simple password can be broken very easily, but a complex one is almost impossible to break. If someone breaks into your home and steals the password book, well, they probably took the PC as well and at least you are certain you need to set up new passwords!

I can remember watching a pre-teen girl break into one of her friends email accounts on a well known online email client in a matter of a couple of minutes. This was done in the friends home, with permission and was a very eye-opening experience. The young girl was not any sort of computer whizz either - the technique was very simple.

Mark

sue2white
19-10-2009, 11:27 AM
Well! This morning I received two 'empty' emails from friends I hadn't heard from for ages. Obviously I opened them, as they are friends....but there was nothing there. Spoofed again.
What is the point in that?
Sue

MarkJ
19-10-2009, 11:31 AM
Did the emails contain any attachments (whether they would open or not) Sue?

Mark

sue2white
19-10-2009, 5:38 PM
No Mark.
There were no attachments....there was 'no nothing!' as my mum would say.

Sue:confused:

MarkJ
19-10-2009, 6:48 PM
Possibly your friends forgot to actually send any content?

If the mails were fakes - perhaps sent via some sort of malware (e.g a worm) - then two possible reasons. First scenario is that the worm may not be working correctly and thus it is carrying out part of its actions - i.e sending an email to each person in the contact address book of your friend, the second could be simply a way to see if you actually are a live address - easily done by including the code for a single pixel image, which is then downloaded from a server somewhere and the server makes a note of your address.

The first scenario is why I asked if there were any attachments. I would scan your PC anyway - just to be safe.

Mark

sue2white
19-10-2009, 9:03 PM
Possibly your friends forgot to actually send any content?

These were two separate 'unrelated' friends - not two emails from one friend. So very unlikely.



If the mails were fakes

They must be!


easily done by including the code for a single pixel image, which is then downloaded from a server somewhere and the server makes a note of your address.

I'm afraid you have lost me here, but I get the gist of what you are saying.

I checked my emails on my work computer (thank goodness!) which scans automatically everyday.....but will check it out tomorrow to see if it found anything.

Thanks Mark.

Sue:)