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royston
11-06-2009, 1:20 PM
I did not update my McAfee antivirus following the initial period that came free with my Dell laptop. So obviously no updates and as someone told me it was virtually no antivirus without updates.
Yesterday I found a pornographic picture in Picasa, which automatically loads any picture that is available.
I have not opened any such picture (to my knowledge) so how on earth did it get into Picasa.
I have now updated my McAfee.
The only strange thing that I did notice the day before was that there was another modem showing on my list. This is now gone. Could this have been the source of the picture.

suemalings
11-06-2009, 1:24 PM
Is your internet connection protected?

If not it means that anyone close by can use your connection.

MarkJ
11-06-2009, 1:31 PM
By "another modem showing", do you mean another connection perhaps?
Are you using wireless? If so, it may have been another wireless network somewhere nearby which you had picked up. That in itself won't cause any problems - it just indicates that there is another network somewhere nearby.

Has anyone else got access to the laptop? It may be that someone else downloaded the image accidentally. Have you run your updated AV program since you updated it? Some malware can place images onto your computer without you doing anything. I would certainly run your Anti Virus program just to be safe - do a full scan.

If you are using wireless, have you got some sort of security set up on your router to prevent others from using your wireless? Just as you could see another wireless network perhaps, then someone else can see yours if they are in the area. Without some sort of security on there, they can simply connect to your wireless network and download stuff/use your connection at will. Unlikely that would add an image to your computer unless someone had managed to access it via an unprotected network.

You need to be using something like WPA as a minimum security setting for wireless networking. Your router instructions should explain how to set that up for you.

Mark

royston
12-06-2009, 1:05 PM
By "another modem showing", do you mean another connection perhaps?
Are you using wireless? If so, it may have been another wireless network somewhere nearby which you had picked up. That in itself won't cause any problems - it just indicates that there is another network somewhere nearby.

Has anyone else got access to the laptop? It may be that someone else downloaded the image accidentally. Have you run your updated AV program since you updated it? Some malware can place images onto your computer without you doing anything. I would certainly run your Anti Virus program just to be safe - do a full scan.

If you are using wireless, have you got some sort of security set up on your router to prevent others from using your wireless? Just as you could see another wireless network perhaps, then someone else can see yours if they are in the area. Without some sort of security on there, they can simply connect to your wireless network and download stuff/use your connection at will. Unlikely that would add an image to your computer unless someone had managed to access it via an unprotected network.

You need to be using something like WPA as a minimum security setting for wireless networking. Your router instructions should explain how to set that up for you.

Mark

Hi Mark and Sue.
Ran the new McAfee and it found some "security alerts".Then said that they had been rectified. Not sure what that means.
Yes, I am using wifi (BT).
The strange available connection that was there the day before the photo (Talk Talk) has not reappeared (and was never there before that day either) so wonder if it was someone in a car ??
Hopefully the problem now solved.
Thank you both for your answers.
Roy

MarkJ
12-06-2009, 1:24 PM
Unlikely Roy - what you saw would be another router, which will be in someones house. Perhaps they were playing around with the aerial orientation to get a better signal and it just happened to "bleed" over that bit further. If the owner of the other router is a bit of a "geek" they might have been playing around with tempura scoops, mirrors or seives to increase the range of the signal (yes, I really have tried this sort of thing!).

My main concern is that you have a suitable form of security on your wireless setup.
BT should use a reasonable level of protection I would imagine, but it is worth checking.
No security = anyone can access the wireless connection and use it.

The first basic security is called WEP, but frankly it is little better than nothing. Anyone who has very simple (and free) software, plus a wireless laptop, can sit outside in their car or whatever and break the security in seconds. Even if you choose a really complex password, it will only take a minute or two to crack it.

WPA is fine. Not the best, but for practical purposes it is secure. It can be cracked, but it isn't easy and thus WPA is the usual standard used now.

WPA2 is an enhanced version of WPA and is considered at this time to be unbreakable with normal equipment.

I use WPA.

Hopefully all is now OK with the machine Roy - sounds as though there was a bit of something residing there but the McAfee has cleared it (hence the rectified message).

Cheers,
Mark

royston
12-06-2009, 3:54 PM
Unlikely Roy - what you saw would be another router, which will be in someones house. Perhaps they were playing around with the aerial orientation to get a better signal and it just happened to "bleed" over that bit further. If the owner of the other router is a bit of a "geek" they might have been playing around with tempura scoops, mirrors or seives to increase the range of the signal (yes, I really have tried this sort of thing!).

My main concern is that you have a suitable form of security on your wireless setup.
BT should use a reasonable level of protection I would imagine, but it is worth checking.
No security = anyone can access the wireless connection and use it.

The first basic security is called WEP, but frankly it is little better than nothing. Anyone who has very simple (and free) software, plus a wireless laptop, can sit outside in their car or whatever and break the security in seconds. Even if you choose a really complex password, it will only take a minute or two to crack it.

WPA is fine. Not the best, but for practical purposes it is secure. It can be cracked, but it isn't easy and thus WPA is the usual standard used now.




WPA2 is an enhanced version of WPA and is considered at this time to be unbreakable with normal equipment.

I use WPA.

Hopefully all is now OK with the machine Roy - sounds as though there was a bit of something residing there but the McAfee has cleared it (hence the rectified message).

Cheers,
Mark


Thanks Mark, you're a Gent, Roy

Procat
13-06-2009, 12:24 AM
I had my wireless modem installed by my ISP when they installed the cable connection.

They made no mention of password protection etc for it and when I had a look around I discovered protection had not been activated. I was a sitting duck for anyone to use my connection.

I was less than impressed I can tell you.

MarkJ
13-06-2009, 12:31 AM
Not good - that ISP is acting negligently in my view.
A lot of older routers had no security by default or at best used WEP. Most now use WPA or WPA2 which is far more secure.

To be honest, where I live there is little chance that anyone would use my connection - I am in the middle of nowhere with one neighbour who has his own wireless setup anyway. But I still have WPA just in case ;)

ISPs and router manufacturers should enable WPA at least by default in my view - it should be part of the setting up of the router.

Mark

Procat
13-06-2009, 12:33 AM
No arguments from me (and also Royston I suspect) Mark. :D

Flossy
14-06-2009, 9:46 PM
I have a wireless connection, but don't understand anything about it.

What is WPA ?
and how would I know whether or not my ISP has set this up?

sorry folks, I'm a real dumbo with this stuff, & just rely on the provider to know/do everything ...

Flossy

MarkJ
15-06-2009, 5:54 PM
Hi Flossy,

Have you got the instructions for your wireless router?
The security settings are going to be somewhere in your router menu. Different routers have different ways to set things up, but it will involve accessing the router from your PC/laptop - I expect you would have done similar when the router arrived to set it all up.

WPA is one of the settings which can be applied to the wireless connection to prevent people from being able to use your connection without permission.
You may well already have security (hopefully WPA!) on the router - if you need a password to use the wireless connection, then you are likely to have some sort of protection.

The router manual is the best place to look for the various settings.

Mark