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benny1982
12-04-2009, 9:06 PM
Hi

I reckon a lot of us on here know the names of many of the ships that fought in the Battle Of Trafalgar. When I ask work colleagues they always say "Victory" then struggle to name the rest. If I ask them to name another ship, they always seem to struggle. I am not boasting here but I can name all of the 27 big ships off by heart.

Ajax
Mars
Leviathan
Agamemnon
Polyphemus
Neptune
Orion
Victory
Tonnant
Temeraire
Thunderer
Conquerer
Revenge
Bellepheron
Prince
Britannia
Royal Sovereign
Swiftsure
Colossus
Achille
Spartiate
Minotaur
Defence
Definat
Dreadnought
Africa
Belleisle

Ben

MarkJ
12-04-2009, 10:48 PM
One of my ancestors was on the Prince. So I knew that one, plus a few of the others ;)

That is my small connection with the Battle of Trafalgar :)

Mark

DBCoup
13-04-2009, 7:15 AM
My connection is even smaller. My ancestor Captain Henry Duncan was commander of the Victory from 19th Apr 1782 to 5th Dec 1782. Eight other commanders and then it was the turn of Captain Thomas M Hardy from 31st Jul 1803 to 13th Jan 1806.
daryl

Jane Gee
13-04-2009, 9:14 AM
Sadly my ancestor must have been having a rest although I think the Colossus comes in somewhere as a ship he served on. I am very impressed Benny that you can name all the ships I love anything to do with the Royal Navy for that period.
I get very excited when I tell people that my ancestor was on the Valiant at the Battle of the Saints and nearly had apoplexy the first time I visited Chatham Dockyard exhibition where the exhibition is based on the building of the Valiant. However I know they havent any idea only if I mention St Lucia do they have any inkling.
Jane

benny1982
13-04-2009, 10:24 AM
Hi

The Victory was the most famous, then the Temeraire was the second I think. Most of the ships were in very bad condition though after the battle. Apparently the Victory was all smashed up with the sails missing.

Ben

AnnieB5051
03-05-2009, 9:50 PM
If you're interested in finding out about the men who served at Trafalgar (unfortunately, there's no list of the wmen who would have been on board), the National Archives' website has a good searchable database at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/trafalgarancestors/

AnnieB

benny1982
11-05-2009, 9:47 AM
Apparently, the French and Spanish fleet all had a ship called Neptune, the same as the English fleet.

Jim B
11-05-2009, 2:24 PM
My words Benny 1982 ,i am lost for words,.......i my self being ex ROYAL NAVY ...you are doing well in remembering all the ships,

In my short career i was on 13 ships ,4 being seagoing ..the other,s [stone frigates. ..it,s the dates i get lost with ,i always have to refer to my [micky mouse]certicate of service, when posting on other websites.

Jim B

benny1982
11-05-2009, 2:39 PM
Hi Jim

Yes I have developed quite an interest in this battle that saved us. I wonder what Nelson would have done in terms of seafaring if he'd lived? Another "if only" though.

Retlaw
11-05-2009, 9:47 PM
If you're interested in finding out about the men who served at Trafalgar (unfortunately, there's no list of the wmen who would have been on board), the National Archives' website has a good searchable database at http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/trafalgarancestors/

AnnieB

Did they press gang women as well as men into the Royal Navy.
What your suggesting is practically impossible. If you want to see the nearest thing to life at sea on a British Battleship of that era, watch the film Master and Commander.

Retlaw

benny1982
12-05-2009, 9:20 AM
I always wonder how many people were on each ship though that fought in the British fleet?

AnnieB5051
13-05-2009, 8:17 AM
Women weren't pressganged - officially they didn't serve at sea at all. In fact, quite a number of women were to be found on many navy ships - they shared the hammocks and lives of the seamen without pay or complaint (well, rarely complaining!). They often acted as nurses during battle, amongst other jobs. One Admiral (?) made a comment at the end of the 18th century about the navy ships becoming floating brothels or some such (not quite that term, but something similar), and there was an attempt to remove women from the ships - their number was reduced but they were not completely removed as they were seen as being good for morale!
As they were never on the muster books of the ships, they are hard to track down as individuals or accurately record their numbers. I think David Cordingly addresses the subject a little in his book "Heroines and harlots".

Anne

Stephen Evans
22-09-2009, 12:13 PM
Can I recommend the Nelson and his World site, that deal with all things, Nelson.:)