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View Full Version : John Padfield, R. of Huntsham Devon Part I



Peggy
20-12-2004, 8:48 AM
After a dozen garbled previews, I'm giving up and trying a 2-part post.

Rev. John PADFIELD became Rector of Huntsham, Devon in 1637. It appears that he attended Trinity College, Cambridge, entering as sizar in 1621. He shows up on the Devon Protestation Returns in 1641. He baptized 9 children in Huntsham (never once giving the name of their mother!) from 1638 to 1656. His father Edward was buried there in 1648; his mother Helen in 1656. The Edward Padfield who was buried in Huntsham in 1679, and whose will was destroyed in the blitz, was very likely a relative. John might have been from Huntsham, but is it more likely that the parents moved there when he got the living? (See part 2)

Peggy
20-12-2004, 8:52 AM
Rev. Padfield fled to Ireland during the Civil War. He is mentioned in "Sufferings of the Clergy." (I have a typescript of a paragraph, but it may be from an abridged version.) At least two of his children, one my ancestress, married into Anglo-Irish families.

Any suggestions for finding his origins, his nameless wife, or other additional info will be greatly appreciated, as will be insight (recommended reading?) into the battles among the clergy on a local level during the Civil War.

Thanks!

Peggy

Geoffers
20-12-2004, 10:05 AM
[He baptized 9 children in Huntsham (never once giving the name of their mother!)]

Isn't that so annoying, frequently happened in this period.

[His father Edward was buried there in 1648; his mother Helen in 1656. The Edward Padfield who was buried in Huntsham in 1679, and whose will was destroyed in the blitz, was very likely a relative. John might have been from Huntsham, but is it more likely that the parents moved there when he got the living?]

I wouldn't have thought there would necessarily be grounds for parents moving to the parish. If they had been very elderly/infirm this might have been the case. But I can't offhand remember an instance of parents following a son to a parish in other circumstances

[Any suggestions for finding his origins]

Is the family menioned in a Visitation?

Do the Manor Court Records mention his admission to the living or anything to do with the glebe?

One of the most complete 'surveys' of this period are the Hearth Tax Returns commencing in 1662. This can be a long search, but from what you have written several of the family seem to have lived in this area. If you work through all the returns for a 10 mile radius and plot the villages in which the family lived, you may build up a cluster of entries in one or two parishes, which may suggest where you should look for records in either the registers, manor records, licences to alienate, Visitations, or court records.

Geoffers
Charlbury, Oxfordshire

Geoffers
20-12-2004, 3:17 PM
[His father Edward was buried there in 1648; his mother Helen in 1656. The Edward Padfield who was buried in Huntsham in 1679,]

One thing I forgot to mention earlier, where are these burials in relation to each other within the church/churchyard? Families are often grouped close together. Also, is their a surviving MI as this might mention family, home parishes, etc.

Geoffers
Charlbury, Oxfordshire

Peggy
21-12-2004, 8:18 AM
Hi Geoffers,

I'm still pondering your suggestions, and trying to find out which of those sources is available and where. I've posted to request a lookup, under Rod's "free lookup month for Devon," for the Visitation and other pedigree CDs. Fingers crossed.

[where are these burials in relation to each other within the church/churchyard? Families are often grouped close together. Also, is their a surviving MI as this might mention family, home parishes, etc.]

Oo . . . er . . . I don't know. :) What I have was sent to me from parish registers. Have to try to track down Huntsham MIs! Thanks!

Aside: I was once within a mile or 2 of Huntsham, happily sipping cider, and unaware of the existence of Rev. John. If only! So much easier with no ocean in the way.

Best,

Peggy

Geoffers
21-12-2004, 9:22 AM
[I'm still pondering your suggestions, and trying to find out which of those sources is available and where. I've posted to request a lookup, under Rod's "free lookup month for Devon," for the Visitation and other pedigree CDs. Fingers crossed.]

Visitations are probably the best bet at the moment. Sorry, not having an interest in Devon I'm afraid I can't help you with that.

As to other documents - Licences to Alienate, Feet of Fines, Common Recoveries, Deeds - yet again I have to mention that they are in The National Archives at Kew.

The Manorial Documents Register on the TNA website
http://www.mdr.nationalarchives.gov.uk/mdr/
will at least tell you what original manor docs survive and where they are. It may be possible to order photographic copies (?)

Short of a cheap-day return, any chance of hitching a ride on the sleigh of that famous chap who's about at this time of year? :)

[Aside: I was once within a mile or 2 of Huntsham, happily sipping cider, and unaware of the existence of Rev. John. If only! So much easier with no ocean in the way.]

After sipping (?!) a couple of pints of scrumpy, I don't think you'd have been in much of a condition to worry about Rev.John anyway ;)

Happy Christmas
Geoffers

Peggy
21-12-2004, 10:11 AM
Hi Geoffers,

[The Manorial Documents Register on the TNA website will at least tell you what original manor docs survive and where they are.]

Not if they were in Devon, it won't! A few places are in the online index. "The remainder of the Manorial Documents Register is held on open access in our research enquiries room (see visit us) . . . ." Santa arrives here on water skis, and it would be a long, bumpy ride. <g>

|banghead|

I could use a pint of scrumpy. (Plural pints might make me forget my own name, never mind Rev. John.)

Best,

Peggy

Peggy
21-12-2004, 10:55 AM
Hi again,

TNA does seem to have some lovely tax records for Huntsham! If I could hitch that ride. . . . Do they heat the place? <BG>

Btw, wouldn't "sizar" suggest a "non-gentry" background for a student? Or maybe "distressed" gentry, I suppose.

Peggy

Geoffers
21-12-2004, 3:38 PM
Btw, wouldn't "sizar" suggest a "non-gentry" background for a student? Or maybe "distressed" gentry, I suppose.
Peggy
I'm aware that there are/were schemes for reduced fees in return for menial duties and that there have always been scholars who have worked their way through University. However, I'm afraid that I don't know enough of the customs of 'The Other Place' ;) to comment with certainty on whether this would be any indication of personal circumstances. I could well imagine a Vicar taking a young pupil whom he considered to be gifted in respect of the bible, under his wing and pushing him to become a priest.

Geoffers
PS it is pleasantly warm at Kew - though with you in Florida and me here, our opinions as to 'pleasant' and 'warm' may differ :)