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View Full Version : Bloodwyte, Childwyte and Wreck of the Sea



busyglen
03-04-2008, 1:11 PM
I have always been interested in the history of the Island where I live, but it is only recently that I have actually had the time to read some of the history books. It is such a shame that although I was born here, my ancestry comes from further afield, as I would have loved to imagine my family here. The Island is steeped in history...a lot recorded and some no doubt, elaborated as the years passed.

I have just come across the three terms above, and thought I would mention them, as I have never heard of them before.

Sir Roger de Shurlande established Shurland Hall as a liberty, which meant that he literally ran and owned his own small village, and was answerable to no one other than the King. He was also given certain rights.

BLOODYWYTE, was the right to fine any of his retinue or servants for the shedding of blood and not keeping the peace in his domain.

CHILDWYTE, was a fine paid to the lord by the father of an illegitimate child. It was regarded as a compensation for cheapening the value of one of the lord's bondswomen.

WRECK OF THE SEA, meant that the lord of the manor was allowed to claim for himself any wreck that he could reach with his lance at low tide. To do this effectively enough to make any real gain, he needed to be able to manage a swimming horse, and to have a horse that would swim freely.

Obviously this is not of interest to the majority of todays genealogists, but I thought it might interest a few.

Glenys

Geoffers
03-04-2008, 1:42 PM
Ah, but it's of interest to me!

The different forms of 'wite' - (Old English) meaning punishment, penalty, torment also included:

'Ferdwite' - a fine in lieu of military service

and the splendidly named 'hellewite' - the torment or punishment of hell.

busyglen
03-04-2008, 3:02 PM
I wondered what the `wite' (wyte) meant, thanks for the explanation. I don't like the sound of the `hellewite'!

The other thing that he had was Amercement of brewers and bakers, which I believe was simply the right to fine the tradesmen if they gave short measure or inferior produce, or regulate their trade if needed.

Really interesting stuff...I'm getting quite hooked! :)

Glenys

Peter_uk_can
03-04-2008, 3:28 PM
WRECK OF THE SEA, meant that the lord of the manor was allowed to claim for himself any wreck that he could reach with his lance at low tide. To do this effectively enough to make any real gain, he needed to be able to manage a swimming horse, and to have a horse that would swim freely.
Glenys

Particularly useful and financially rewarding if you are in the area where one vessel discharges several expensive motorbikes and another, some 5000 tons of timber.

With enough timber to build the largest pallisade in England and a motorbike on which to cruise one's estate, I can see no justifcation in usurping such rights. :)

busyglen
03-04-2008, 4:50 PM
Particularly useful and financially rewarding if you are in the area where one vessel discharges several expensive motorbikes and another, some 5000 tons of timber.

With enough timber to build the largest pallisade in England and a motorbike on which to cruise one's estate, I can see no justifcation in usurping such rights. :)

|biggrin||biggrin||biggrin|

Glenys

Davran
03-04-2008, 5:16 PM
Glenys, I think we could do with a bit of bloodwyte and childwyte down our end of the county, judging by the local paper! |biggrin|

busyglen
03-04-2008, 5:22 PM
Glenys, I think we could do with a bit of bloodwyte and childwyte down our end of the county, judging by the local paper! |biggrin|

Too right! We're not much better here. We've got an arsonist at the moment setting cars alight at nights. There's been quite a lot, plus a suspect house fire and an old mill that had almost been renovated. I'm just glad that we are living on the top of a hill, away from all of the hassle.

I don't know why we had to have a new bridge....a drawbridge would have been better!!

Glenys