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Wirral
13-11-2007, 10:54 PM
I am reading a brilliant book at the moment, "Georgette Heyer's Regency World" - The definitive guide to the people, places & society in Georgette Heyer's Regency novels by Jennifer Kloester . ISBN 0434013293

According to the book, the term "Regency" is used to describe the period of English history between the years 1780 & 1830, although the true Regency only lasted from 1811 to 1820 when George, Prince of Wales was Regent in place of his father, "Mad" King George III. (Turns out he was not insane, but probably had a blood disease, porphyria).

The book covers everything from High Society to chimneysweeps. You don't need to have read any of Georgette Heyer's books to find it interesting & it's very readable.

Copper
13-11-2007, 11:28 PM
Ooo thanks for telling us about this book. I think that I have read all of Georgette Heyer's book. I have always liked the Regency period.

I will have to buy this book.

Sue Mackay
14-11-2007, 9:32 AM
Seconded! Got that one. Devoured all Georgette Heyer as a teenager and many times since. I now enjoy romances set in the Regency period by Mary Balogh, Liz Carlyle, Jo Beverley and Mary-Jo Putney. The last named has tended towards modern era novels recently, but her Regency ones all have very well researched sub themes, many ivolving medical knowledge of the time; one hero fights a battle with alcoholism, another is told he is dying of a wasting disease (but is actually being systematically poisoned) and a third is badly wounded at Waterloo and is saved by a blood transfusion via a quill - blood courtesy of the heroine of course :D

bwarnerok
14-11-2007, 2:54 PM
Simply amazing the people who turn their noses up to those marvelous thigh throbbers that just ooze with historical info! A couple of other reference materials that I've gathered which have been helpful for me are:

"English Society in the 18th Century" by Roy Porter
"An Elegant Madness in Regency England" by Venetia Murray
and for a really good insight into London (lots of info on the sewers and sanitation) is "Victorian London, the Tale of a City 1840-1870" by Liza Picard

Several years ago I found myself in London for a quick stopover. My "guide" was a friend who I didn't know that well and had no idea of my vast research or interest in the world of the regency (thanks to the bodice rippers). He's pointing out Big Ben and Westminster and I'm searching my little map from the underground with frustration looking for Rotten Row and Mayfair and Almacks! He's dragging me kicking and screaming to the Marble Arch and all I want to know is where is Vauxhall Gardens!

So now I hope that somebody will please print up the "Bodice Rippers Guide to London".. and it wouldn't hurt to run around the city and put up some pink plaques. :-)

That way those of us who have done decades of careful intense research between the pages of Heyer, Carlyle, Dodd, Jordan, etc.. can find our way around.

-b-

Sue Mackay
14-11-2007, 3:54 PM
So now I hope that somebody will please print up the "Bodice Rippers Guide to London".. and it wouldn't hurt to run around the city and put up some pink plaques. :-)
That way those of us who have done decades of careful intense research between the pages of Heyer, Carlyle, Dodd, Jordan, etc.. can find our way around.



The London Encyclopaedia ed. Ben Weinreb and Christopher Hibbert is excellent.
Paperback: 1028 pages
Publisher: Pan Macmillan (October 29, 1987)
ISBN-10: 0333458176
ISBN-13: 978-0333458174
Amazon.com has some copies available via second hand dealers for about $30 and it's well worth that.

Tells you all you want to know about the history and location of Almacks and Vauxhall Gardens, complete with engravings.

You can also find a lot of articles on the Regency period on Jo beverley's website at http://members.shaw.ca/jobev/menu.html

Wirral
14-11-2007, 5:52 PM
Simply amazing the people who turn their noses up to those marvelous thigh throbbers that just ooze with historical info! ...

So now I hope that somebody will please print up the "Bodice Rippers Guide to London".. and it wouldn't hurt to run around the city and put up some pink plaques. :-)

That way those of us who have done decades of careful intense research between the pages of Heyer, Carlyle, Dodd, Jordan, etc.. can find our way around.

-b-
I don't know about the other authors, but having got copies of all of Heyer's books (including the one that hasn't been reprinted) I can't recall a single bodice being ripped.:confused: They might be romantic, but they are totally free of sxx.

LynA
14-11-2007, 6:22 PM
I don't know about the other authors, but having got copies of all of Heyer's books (including the one that hasn't been reprinted) I can't recall a single bodice being ripped.:confused: They might be romantic, but they are totally free of sxx.

Heyer is definitely underrated. One or two of the novels may be a little slight but most show a great deal of informative historical research. AND they are all entertaining to read.

Which is the one that hasn't been reprinted? I'll have to search for it.

I think a bodice got ripped, or at least an earring torn off in the Spanish Bride. :D

Lynda|book|

Wirral
14-11-2007, 6:31 PM
Which is the one that hasn't been reprinted? I'll have to search for it.

The Great Roxhythe, published 1923.

birdlip
15-11-2007, 9:47 AM
I agree Liza Pickards 'Victorian London' is absolutely fascinating, and packed with minute details about how ordinary people lived. I've read and re read my copy, and refer to it constantly.