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Claudius
25-08-2007, 8:05 PM
Hi,
The name of Colonel Thomas Wanklin popped up whilst I was researching my ancestors the Wanklins of Gladestry. He served in the King's army in the English Civil War, having been previously Steward to the Earl of Marlborough. There was apparently some hanky panky going on between Wanklin and the Earl's wife, the Countess of Marlborough and after the Earl's death Wanklin and the Countess married. Wanklin was elected to parliament at the Restoration and after some years of service was thrown out for abusing Parliamentary priviledge.

That's as far as I can get in researching Colonel Thomas Wanklin. If anyone has any further info, like the name of the regiment in which he served, what happened to him after being thrown out of Parliament, names of children or descendants or anything else of interest I would be grateful if you could post it here.

Geoff.

AnnB
26-08-2007, 1:20 PM
Hello Geoff

I can't add much to your knowledge of Colonel Thomas Wanklin (Wanklen/Wanklyn) but I do have a copy of an article taken from "The Ancestor" magazine (April 1904) which tells the story of The Westbury Cup, presented to Westbury Church, Wiltshire, with the inscription "Given to the Church of Westbury by Collonel Wanklen and Mary Contes of Malbrou 1671" (spelling obviously wasn't their strong point;)) If you are interested, I have a scanned copy which I can e-mail you (five pages including a picture of the cup).

The article includes a few snippets about Thomas and Mary (taken from various sources at the time) including
"1670 2 June the Countess of Marlborough, mother to the Earl that was killed in the sea fight, 1666, died. Buried by her second husband (Thomas Wanklyn, son of a smith) in her garden between 2 boards under a turnip plot, because Mr Ash, who was to enter upon her joynter, should not know it. About Michaelmas following she was taken up and buried by her husband at Westbury in the plain of Wiltshire."

Mary was the daughter of Sir Arthur Capel of Hadham, Herts. I have no interest in the Wanklin family, my interest lies with the Earls of Marlborough.

Best wishes
Ann

Claudius
26-08-2007, 6:20 PM
Hi Ann,
Thanks very much for the information about Colonel Wanklin. He certainly was a character. It's very interesting that the Colonel was the son of a smith. I am trying to establish whether there is any link between the Colonel and the Wanklins of Gladestry and the hereditary occupation of the Gladestry Wanklins was smith. Do you happen to know if Colonel Wanklin and the Countess had any children?
It would be great if you could send me the information you have on the Westbury cup. My email address is spec@fsmail.net

Regards,
Geoff

AnnB
27-08-2007, 6:47 AM
Hello Geoff

As far as I know, the Colonel and the Countess had no children, but I have not actually tried to find out!!

I will e-mail you the article about the Westbury Cup later today, and if I come across any other refs to the 'good' Colonel, I'll let you know.

Best wishes
Ann

Claudius
27-08-2007, 9:11 PM
Thanks Ann.

Geoff

IvorCarr
29-08-2007, 9:50 AM
Thomas Wanklin, of Westbury Wiltshire, served as major in the foot regiment of Sir Edward Seymour. This was a Devon regiment and appears to have been based on Seymour's prewar Trained Band regiment. In September 1644 Seymour gave up his various offices in favour of his son (also Edward). Col Edward Seymour was governor of Dartmouth and already had a foot regiment so the two units may well have been merged. At the fall of Dartmouth "Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Wankland" was listed amongst the prisoners. However it is not clear what unit he was serving in at this time as Seymour's Lieutenant Colonel seems to have been one Nicholas Codrington. It is possible he was in the regiment of Hugh Pollard whose Lietenant Colonel is unknown and which also formed part of the garrison.
He compounded at a sixth (58) in 1651 for an estate held of the Countess of Marlborough for life. That is he paid a fine of one sixth of the value of his estate to regain control of it.

Sources: 'A List of Officers claiming to the sixty thousand pounds...' (1663) col 119; John Vicars 'Magnalia Dei Anglicana or the third part of Englands Parliamentary Chronicals' (1646) p355; 'Calendar of the Committee for Compounding' p2732.

In case it did not come up from other postings the story about the temporary burial of the Countess and Wanklin being a former smith comes from 'The Life and Times of Anthony Wood' vol 2 p194

Claudius
29-08-2007, 11:53 AM
Wow! Thanks, Ivor that's a lot to go on. Ann's information had pointed me in the direction of Anthony Wood but the rest is entirely new to me and very helpful. Thanks for taking the time to look into the Colonel for me.

Geoff

IvorCarr
29-08-2007, 2:33 PM
Geoff
Just found the following.
'A seasonable argument to perswade all the grand juries in England to petition for a new Parliament, or, A list of the principal labourers in the great design of popery and arbitrary power who have betrayed their country to the conspirators, and bargain'd with them to maintain a standing army in England ...'
Andrew Marvell 1677

Westbury, Thomas Wanklin, Esq; once a poor Serving Man, now one of the Commissioners of the Excise in Ireland, and 50 l. a Session. Kept an Inn at Kingston three Years, now keeps a Tavern in Essex Buildings in the Strand.

From: 'An argument for a petition for a new Parliament', The History and Proceedings of the House of Commons : volume 5: 1713-1714 (1742), pp. 15-30. Date accessed: 29 August 2007.

Claudius
30-08-2007, 8:05 PM
Thanks again, Ivor, I had come across this snippet already but thanks for letting me know. I originally thought it referred to one of the Colonel's descendants as the version I saw was dated 1742 but another identical copy was dated 1677 so it must be the Colonel himself.

Geoff.