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BeeE586
09-02-2006, 10:57 AM
I have received the following message from a trusted contact ....

"If someone by the name of j_neutron07 wants
>to add you to their list don't accept it. Its a virus. Tell everyone on
>your list because if somebody on your list adds them you will get it
>too. It is a hard drive killer and a very horrible virus. Please pass
>this on to everyone on your list. We need to find out who is using it
>
I have no reason to think the warning other than genuine and pass it on in good faith.

Eileen

John
09-02-2006, 11:27 AM
Imagine, you have 50 folk in your address book, these 50 people have another 50, who then send it on to another 50!
Who needs to write viruses when virus warnings are so easy and effective?

Good AV software wins every time.

John

Mythology
09-02-2006, 12:16 PM
BIN

(And severely chastise "trusted contact" for sending you such rubbish)

There are Lord knows how many variations on this theme, which usually have a couple of things in common:

1) They are not just a friendly warning for you - they want you to pass it on to the entire planet, the principal aim of the hoax writer being to try and screw things up by bogging down e-mail systems.

2) They include a claim that this "virus" is a really bad one which will at least wipe out all your files and, like this one, they'll probably tell you that it will actually kill your hard drive.

This particular one appears to be a variation on
THIS ONE (http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/venc/data/yim.hard.drive.killer.hoax.html)
As they say, it can vary, and you will notice a distinct similarity - "Its a virus" with no apostrophe, and "It is a hard drive killer and very horrible virus.", almost the exact same wording for that sentence.

I repeat,

BIN

busyglen
09-02-2006, 12:33 PM
Eileen, I received a warning similar to this from a family member....however, it had been forwarded from a friend of theirs, so I did what I always do in these cases. Click on Viruses (I'm on AOL and they have a section on it) or Google on Viruses, and put in the name given. It will soon tell you if it is a hoax, which indeed this is.

I always used to worry about viruses, but I have virus protection, and apart from being careful what I download at any time, I don't think about it much. If I get a warning, or an email like the one you received, I check it out, and in all cases so far, they have proven to be hoaxes.

It's kind that you have thought to warn us all, but as in all warnings, check them out and rely on your virus protection to do it's job....providing you keep it updated.

Hope you stay virus free. |wave|

Glenys

BeeE586
09-02-2006, 1:01 PM
I am aware, and wary, of all such messages and do have virus protection which I run regularly, along with Spyware, Firewall etc. I HAVE NOT passed this to anyone other than this Forum so am not guilty of clogging up the e-mail system, and I did add a proviso.

There is always a chance that such a message could be genuine, and the contact (who I have no reason whatsoever to doubt) probably passed it on to me in good faith as I have posted to the Forum. What should I do in the future ? Should I just bin everything regardless and perhaps allow a virus to get through without passing on a warning ? To me this would be akin to seeing someone run from my neighbour's house with a bag full of discs and the CD player under his arm and doing nothing about it.

I admit to being an internet novice and am willing to be guided by anyone with superior knowledge. For instance, I did not know that I could Google on Viruses (silly me) and thank Glenys for the information. This is one thing that I shall remember should the occasion arise again.

Eileen

pejay
09-02-2006, 1:34 PM
:) hi - i agree it can be very difficult sometimes to know what is genuine, and info about these sort of things can get passed onto us in good faith by friends. i too am really an internet novice and seem to be learning all the time, i certainly will remember to use google [i didn't know either]

Diane Grant-Salmon
09-02-2006, 2:04 PM
Hi Eileen |wave|

If you click on this site, it tells you which viruses are real or hoax. :)
http://www.sophos.com/virusinfo/

Mythology
09-02-2006, 2:38 PM
Firstly, I'm not having a go at you here, Eileen - I realise that you didn't pass it on, so you are completely blameless, and if I seem a bit irate, that's because I loath the people who write these hoaxes, but the person who sent it to you (and presumably, to everyone else they know, as requested by the hoaxer) should be made aware what a genuine nuisance these things are.

In a business environment, sensible companies, appreciating that not everyone can tell what's real and what isn't, tell their staff to never pass on any virus warnings - let the IT manager know and let him/her handle it. Less sensible companies find that their mail server has crashed due to everyone in the company mailing everyone else in the company with the "warning".

(More follows - split due to duplicating text problem)

Mythology
09-02-2006, 2:39 PM
(continued)

"To me this would be akin to seeing someone run from my neighbour's house with a bag full of discs and the CD player under his arm and doing nothing about it."

Not really - in such a case you have seen (or suspect you have seen - I'd make sure the neighbours were out first in case they'd sold it to him and he was just running because he was in a hurry!) a crime being committed. You would presumably phone the police - but you are not telling everyone in the entire town to phone the police, thus jamming the switchboard.

If you know somebody who, despite having up to date antivirus software (without which it's akin to your neighbour hanging a "gone on holiday" notice in their front window and leaving the front door open) has actually suffered as a result of a new virus which Norton, AVG etc. haven't caught up with yet, then yes, if you know what you're doing, it's worth scouting around on the various security sites and the more seriously techy forums, identifying it, telling your friends what happened, what the name of it is, and referring them to a reputable web site which has the technical detail so that they can read for themselves and take any necessary precautions until the fix is released.

That is about the only reason I can think of for sending warnings, and in all the years I've been on the internet I think I've only ever done that once in a short "Beware of this one (name of virus and link to security site) - Fred's McAffee is up to date but they don't have it covered yet and he got clobbered this morning" message - no "pass it on to everyone you know", no alarmist "it will destroy everything on your PC" - any message that includes that sort of thing should be treated as garbage and binned straight away.

BeeE586
09-02-2006, 4:13 PM
To Diane and Myth

Thank you, this is just the sort of information and reasoned argument that is most useful and very much appreciated. As has been said many times on the Forum in all sorts of situations - we all have to learn and rely on other, more knowledgeable, posters to do the teaching.

Eileen -- |wave|

busyglen
09-02-2006, 6:18 PM
As you have said Eileen, if nothing else it has brought this problem to the attention of others who may not have been aware, if you had not posted the message. :)

Glenys

arthurk
09-02-2006, 8:18 PM
If you know somebody who, despite having up to date antivirus software (without which it's akin to your neighbour hanging a "gone on holiday" notice in their front window and leaving the front door open) has actually suffered as a result of a new virus which Norton, AVG etc. haven't caught up with yet, then yes, if you know what you're doing, it's worth scouting around on the various security sites and the more seriously techy forums, identifying it, telling your friends what happened, what the name of it is, and referring them to a reputable web site which has the technical detail so that they can read for themselves and take any necessary precautions until the fix is released.
... but do be careful about where you go, and I would suggest if possible restrict yourself to sites which you are sure are those of reputable anti-virus companies, such as Symantec (Norton), McAfee, AVG, Sophos - possibly going to their home pages and searching from there.

About a month ago I changed from an elderly version of Norton AntiVirus to AVG, and AVG decided that a program which my PC manufacturer had preinstalled was potentially dodgy, in that it could be exploited by virus writers to cause havoc. I wanted to know more, so googled on its name. The first site that came up seemed a bit odd, and might possibly have been a virus writers' forum. Anyway, not long after this I got a real virus (trojan) in the system, and I'm convinced it had something to do with visiting this site. In my case the trojan kept copying itself to new locations in the system files so it was impossible for an anti-virus program to root it out, and my only option was to do a complete reinstall of Windows. It wasn't particularly difficult, but it was extremely time-consuming and stressful, and I'd rather not have to do it again.

Arthur

busyglen
10-02-2006, 10:02 AM
Thanks for pointing that out Arthur. I `do' look at Symantec, but must admit that I have done a `google' in the past to check a Virus. I must say that I hadn't thought about dodgy Virus writers appearing in Google, but then as most everything else appears there, I don't know why I hadn't thought of that! I must have been lucky as I only looked at the major Virus protection companies that came up.

We live and learn! :)

Glenys

Davran
24-02-2006, 6:32 PM
Hi

What a knowledgeable lot you are! I have received the "olympic torch" hoax a couple of times recently, but am always wary of these things, so deleted each time. I didn't know about checking up on them on the internet, so the tip about sophos is most welcome. Thanks.