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Colin Moretti
09-08-2005, 9:11 PM
The English Chronicle and Universal Evening Post

No 1967, 1 4 October 1791
On Wednesday last, a woman, of the name of Lawrie, was drummed through the streets of Edinburgh for having returned to Scotland, being banished that country. This, we believe, is the first instance of a person having been punished for a similar offence.

Colin

Trish
09-08-2005, 10:19 PM
...a woman, of the name of Lawrie, was drummed through the streets of Edinburgh for having returned to Scotland, being banished that country...Oooh. Sounds painful. What exactly does being "drummed" out of town entail? Do you know, Colin? Or anyone else?

Trish

Guy Etchells
10-08-2005, 8:05 AM
Being walked to the city limits accompanied by the constable and a drummer beating a side-drum.
Cheers
Guy
p.s. The point of the drumming is to draw attention to the individual being escorted out of town.

Trish
10-08-2005, 2:41 PM
Being walked to the city limits accompanied by the constable and a drummer beating a side-drum.
Cheers
Guy
p.s. The point of the drumming is to draw attention to the individual being escorted out of town.Thanks, Guy. And what would one have to have done to warrant being drummed out of town? Petty crime, drunkeness, vagrancy, maybe being released from jail [gaol?] and being deemed an undesirable resident?

Trish

Sandman
18-12-2005, 11:26 AM
I don't know about Edinburgh, but a familiar sight during the latter part of the eighteenth century was the drumming out of prostitutes from army training camps. The artist, Paul Sandby, made an etching of this which shows a prostitute being drummed out of a training camp in Hyde Park. You should be able to find a copy of this on the web, but failing that, there is a coloured reproduction in Richard Holmes' book, "Redcoat".

Sharron
21-12-2005, 9:54 PM
Do you know what? I sit beside a lovely woman in work. She is great. Pretty, and funny. The whole package, you know?

However, she would never describe herself as the sharpest knife in the box.

And then yesterday, somebody mentioned being "drummed out of town", and she (the blunt knife) mimed drumming and said she would be marched out of town.

I did a double take and then explained why. She said she hadn't realised the significance of it.

And the moral of the story is: it's surprising what we don't realise we know.

John
23-12-2005, 2:07 PM
Talking of being 'drummed out' leads us neatly sideways into 'rough music' a missed custom which could save all the bother of asbo's and the like.

Sharron
23-12-2005, 2:30 PM
Sorry John, but that's gone right over my head!

John
30-12-2005, 11:19 AM
Sorry John, but that's gone right over my head!
Thought it might waste time over christmas:)

Anti social families? Too much noise, disruption, questionable morals?
The neighbours would gather around the house and with the assistance of pans, tin baths, sticks or any thing else to hand that would make a noise and play 'rough music' until the family either mended their ways or did a flit.

John

Sharron
30-12-2005, 11:26 AM
Don't think that would work where I live. That's mainly what the others do!

Sandman
10-01-2006, 2:36 PM
Rough music was particularly employed when either a husband or wife had been unfaithful. A procession of neighbours making such a noise and ridiculing the husband or wife involved was called a "Skimmington Ride".