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ash33au
17-07-2008, 10:40 AM
A great majority of the ancestors on my maternal grandmothers line are from Prussia originally. The word passed down through generations is that they all left Prussia in the mid 1800s due to political and/or religious persecution.

I know factually that one of my lines is the Von Bulow's, who are of course related to essentially every royal dynasty in the history of Europe - they don't seem to be the problem.

It's the Semmler's, Kruger's, Prange's, Poldrack's, Hahn's and Kubale's that I can't seem to track why they left Prussia. All settled in South Australia before branching out and from my extensive research are essentially all Lutheran. My grandmother was also a Lutheran at the time of her marriage in the 1940s, although she was second generation Australian by that stage.

Does anyone know why so many families fled Prussia in the mid to late 1800s and went to South Australia?

MarkJ
17-07-2008, 10:44 AM
Not sure about specific Prussian motives Ash - which may,as you say, be political or religious. Have you looked into the history of the area at that time? It may offer a clue to why they emigrated.

I know that a lot of UK people went to Australia in the 1800s for the mining. A number of my ancestors went there - mainly to Broken Hill, but other locations as well.
Any mining skills known amongst your ancestors who emigrated?

Mark

ChristineR
17-07-2008, 10:51 AM
You may be interested in the text of this speech - on the University of Adelaide's website.

http://www.adelaide.edu.au/news/news7661.html
Opening remarks: The Hon John von Doussa, QC
Tuesday, 4 October 2005
THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
The German Presence in South Australia
Conference: September 30 - October 1, 2005

C :)

ash33au
17-07-2008, 10:55 AM
The only miners are my mum's paternal side - the Whalley's - who came here from Lancashire.

Friedrich Semmler was a blacksmith and denounced his Prussian nationality prior to coming to Australia. I have that information and the family lore only mentions that it may have been a political move. He uprooted his entire family and moved here and one thing I have noticed is that his written english was excellent, even by today's standards.

The Hahn's I can't find a lot about, except they are cousins of the famous Hahn's who settled in Hahndorf and created the wine making empire. Think they may have just come here to join family as there are a lot of them in SA.

The Kubale's are the hardest family line to find out anything about. Their English can't have been too good because they spell their surname differently so often that I can't be sure of the true spelling and hence can't accurately trace them enough to know anything else. They also weren't great at knowing who their kin were.

The Prange's seem to be quite different in that as far back as I've gone (about 12 gen's) they appear to be rather unique if names are anything to go by. So perhaps they came from somewhere like Latvia, Finland or Ukraine originally and due to some war at the time, maybe they disappeared in a hurry.

ash33au
17-07-2008, 10:57 AM
You may be interested in the text of this speech - on the University of Adelaide's website.

http://www.adelaide.edu.au/news/news7661.html
Opening remarks: The Hon John von Doussa, QC
Tuesday, 4 October 2005
THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
The German Presence in South Australia
Conference: September 30 - October 1, 2005

C :)

Thanks Christine, you are an absolute gun! You always have a great answer for everything.


"Hahndorf was, as you know, a settlement that attracted many German emigrants of the Lutheran faith who were fleeing the dictates of the Prussian Union Church, dictates which we would now identify as constituting religious and political persecution. They were in the first instance attracted by the condition attaching to the establishment of the colony of South Australia that there was to be religious freedom. The first contingent of emigrants was welcomed by the philanthropy and religious good spirit of George Fife Angus and others who enabled them to settle on lands at Klemzig. News of their welcome and of the potential for prosperity in this new land attracted many others seeking to escape the beliefs and disciplines expected of them in their Fatherland. Those that came with Captain Hahn in the "Zebra" soon afterwards, and settled in Hahndorf, were also the beneficiaries of kindness and support in gaining lands from the established landowners of the district."