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Stuman
26-11-2004, 10:08 AM
I thought that this board would be one of the busy ones as I seem to have come across lots of people with maritime connections. I have three lines out of 16 that are mariners and spent some time at sea myself so perhaps I have an infalated sense of the importance of the seagoing people.

I have one piece of family "myth?" that I would love to be able to follow up on but I have so little to go on. The story was that one of my ancestors James MANNING (born 1848) was on a ship on the coast of Australia at the time of one of the gold rushes there. The whole ship's company walked off and headed for the gold fields so the Captain gave James permision to follow. He apparently found some gold and had a signet ring made which I now own. He returned to England with the fortune but there was either cheated out of it or lost it in a card game acording to the legend.

I would like to find something substantial to back up the legend. I have found what may be James as a crew member on a ship on the Australian coast but no more. Has anyone else got family legends that they are unable to substantiate.

Trish
26-11-2004, 7:43 PM
...I have one piece of family "myth?" that I would love to be able to follow up on... The story was that one of my ancestors James MANNING (born 1848)... apparently found some gold and had a signet ring... returned to England with the fortune but there was either cheated out of it or lost it in a card game...

...I would like to find something substantial to back up the legend... Has anyone else got family legends that they are unable to substantiate. Ooh, a hard one to track down and substantiate. Good luck!

I also have a family legend which I cannot confirm. The story goes that my ancestor, Walter Garner, was a ship's captain who was murdered by his first mate aboard ship, mid-voyage. Walter's death was attributed to an asthmatic attack but, years later, on his death-bed, the first mate confessed to the murder and that he had done it to get his hands on the cargo. His route apparently took him down to the coast of Africa but what could the precious cargo have been? And wouldn't the first mate have to account for it when he returned to port?

Another conflicting family story is that two of Walter's daughters were travelling with him when he was attacked by crew members. The girls barricaded themselves in his quarters and were rescued by a passing ship whose captain knew their father and recognized the vessel.

Obviously, these two stories don't work well together and there's something pretty skewy somewhere.

I've been able to confirm that my ancestor was a master mariner who sailed out of Plymouth, Liverpool and Cardiff over a period of about 30 years. He did suffer from asthma and he did die in his early 50s, leaving a young widow and 7 children. One of his ships may have been named "Coquette." Everything else is up for debate.

This could be an interesting topic. Any other "fishy" stories out there?

Trish
Toronto, Canada

stephen fisher
05-01-2005, 2:50 AM
I too have a family sea story. GG william CORNETT of Sunderland sea going engineer. Died early 1900's either at sea or in San Francisco,CA. Have so far been unable to trace him. Any helpwould be much obliged

Geoffers
05-01-2005, 9:29 AM
I too have a family sea story. GG william CORNETT of Sunderland sea going engineer. Died early 1900's either at sea or in San Francisco,CA. Have so far been unable to trace him. Any helpwould be much obliged
Most of the ships' crew lists formerly held by TNA in document class BT99, are now in the posession of the Memorial University of Newfoundland. I understand that they will carry out research for a fee.

Certificates of competency for Engineers ar held by TNA at Kew in class BT139-BT142. I haven't used them but understand that they include name, place and date of birth, date and place certificate was issued, rank and also note deaths, injuries and retirements. This may be of use to you.

Geoffers
Charlbury, Oxfordshire