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Andrew Sellon
29-09-2004, 11:16 AM
Is there any method of useing ones spell checker on messages? There will be some very peculiar spellings from dyslexic me if not!

Londonwhay
29-09-2004, 1:50 PM
Is there any method of useing ones spell checker on messages? There will be some very peculiar spellings from dyslexic me if not!
Hi Andrew, one tip is to compose your message in your word processor, spell check it, then cut and paste it into the thread.

G

Andrew Sellon
29-09-2004, 3:50 PM
G -

The whole idea is to make life simpler. Going back to cutting and pasting from one application to another is, I'm afraid, not an option so far as I'm concerned.

Londonwhay
29-09-2004, 4:07 PM
G -

The whole idea is to make life simpler. Going back to cutting and pasting from one application to another is, I'm afraid, not an option so far as I'm concerned.
Fair enough and as this is a genealogy forum I for one will not be checking for spelling errors.

Maureen
29-09-2004, 9:17 PM
Andrew, if you've done all this without a spell checker, you're doing better than average :)

Peggy
25-05-2005, 12:10 AM
Hi,

I've just joined another Forum. (To ask one little question about a US pilot in WWI) Things look very familiar. It seems to be using the same software as here. But there is a spell check! Even for Private Messages!

If it is possible, please couldn't we have that too? I was raised to suffer acute embarrassment if I sent off a letter containing spelling errors. Blame my ancestors, many of whom were teachers. :)

Peggy

Rod Neep
25-05-2005, 2:22 AM
And spell chequers can make awe full miss takes.


Bottom line is... don't worry about it, as long as you spell the name of your ancestory correctly :)

Rod

Peggy
25-05-2005, 4:09 AM
Hi Rod,

The planets will likely stay in their orbits if I spell ancestor "ansester" or even if I think that nuclear should be "nucular." By the same token, the world won't stop spinning on its axis if I download some notional family tree going back to Adam and Eve, get a few free census lookups, and call it genealogy. In the great scheme of things, one could say that neither matters. But that won't stop people from caring about "getting it right." So if that's the bottom line, I'll just keep worrying, and keep trying to remember to take the extra time to check my posts for typos in another program.

Peggy

P. S. If you find yourself pursued by ghosts wielding rulers, those are my schoolteacher ancestors. :D

AnnB
25-05-2005, 8:00 AM
And spell chequers can make awe full miss takes.


And it makes me feel better to know that other people's brains work at a different speed to their fingers (which happen to me all the time) when I see words that have all the right letters, but they are in the wrong order ;) I've taken at least 10 mintues to wrtie tihs......
Best wishes
Ann

Diane Grant-Salmon
25-05-2005, 9:22 AM
Hi Andrew,

Such good advive here ..... note the 'v' instead of 'c' in that word! I'm always doing that when I type that owrd ...... just done another with fingers getting mixed up with keys!

People here are too nice to worry about spellings, there are loads of words I can't spell, jewelery?/jewellery/jewellry is the pain of my life, so I always write jewels ...... not that I have any though! :D

The only important things are your Mames and dates, the rest isn't important. On the odd occasion when I wtite a handwritten letter, I hate it when I mistake or miss a word out, as I have to re-write the whole thing again ..... this was drilled into me by my School teachers! :(

Lottie
25-05-2005, 11:40 PM
Ann

Yes a common problem, for those of us who are self taught typists, it gets worse as you get older .

Andrew a tip from one, who replies on a Spell Checker, on a computer , hand writing I'm fine , but for some reason my left hand is more eager than my right , when typing!! Read it through before hitting 'submit '

Believe me, you will be more embarrassed about errors, than will be noticed by any of those, who read them ;)

ahppy uhnting

Lottie
New Zealand

busyglen
26-05-2005, 6:30 PM
Somebody had allegedly died in the registration district of "Uskubgtib".

That's what you get if your right hand is one key too far left when you type "Islington". :D

How true! I did this recently...typed away not looking at the screen as I was reading something off, and when I looked up it was complete gobbledegook!! I do try not to do this, but it does happen.

One of my more embarrassing moments on this forum was when we were talking `strange names' and I mentioned Julius Caesar.....only I typed Julias Caeser!! Where that came from I will never know!! |shakehead|

Glenys

Rod Neep
26-05-2005, 6:46 PM
If you realy, really want to confuse a touch typist, then flip off four or five of the keys, and snap them in again, mixing them up in different places ;-)

They think that their computer has gone wrong.

Not that I would ever do such a thing of course :D

Mark
26-05-2005, 9:07 PM
If you realy, really want to confuse a touch typist, then flip off four or five of the keys, and snap them in again, mixing them up in different places ;-)

They think that their computer has gone wrong.

Not that I would ever do such a thing of course :D


er ... don't follow this ... a proper touch typist won't get confused by that procedure at all. They'll be watching the screen, not the keyboard. So the keycaps are irrelevant. The microswitches that get "touched" by the swapped keycap couldn't care less what the inscription on the keycap is.

Mark

busyglen
27-05-2005, 9:24 AM
Actually Rod, it's not the `touch typist' that would be confused. But I suspect you said this tongue in cheek. ;)

As Mark says, `we' automatically put our hands on the home keys, without looking. Well I do anyway. Occasionally my keyboard has been moved slightly from it's usual position, and I slip up with my right hand. I was taught with a blank keyboard 64 years ago and my fingers have never forgotten where the keys are. Somewhat like playing the piano, your hands never really forget. :)

Glenys

Geoffers
27-05-2005, 9:31 AM
I'm a touch typist - I look at the keyboard and try to guess which key to touch

Geoffers
Now up to 50 words per week :)

busyglen
27-05-2005, 11:05 AM
I was taught with a blank keyboard 64 years ago .
Glenys

Oops! |blush| I can't count either I should have said 46 years ago! I guess my fingers decided to play games and trip me up! See.....no-one is perfect!!
Or are they? ;)

Glenys

Mark
27-05-2005, 5:14 PM
Oops! |blush| I can't count either I should have said 46 years ago! I guess my fingers decided to play games and trip me up! See.....no-one is perfect!!
Or are they? ;)

Glenys


Crikey ... I'd like to have seen the computer that the keyboard was hooked up to 46 years ago.

Mark

Diane Grant-Salmon
27-05-2005, 6:17 PM
|rant| Tut, tut ...... Naughty Myth!

Ladkyis
27-05-2005, 9:13 PM
Hey Mark,

They were called typewriters and don't mock the computers because they had those during WW2

I too was taugh to touch type and could 21 words a minute... until the errors were deducted and then my speed was 11 words a minute. My typing teacher suggested that I find something else to do because I would never earn a living in an office. This was a huge relief because I was planning on running my pony trekking business full time just as soon as I got out of agricultural college and any typing would be done slowly.
Ann

busyglen
28-05-2005, 3:11 PM
Crikey ... I'd like to have seen the computer that the keyboard was hooked up to 46 years ago.

Mark

Oh dear.....now I feel really old!! :(

Actually, it was an old Royal typewriter...big, black and you had to thump the keys to actually get them to work!! I never could get the hang of the electric typewriter when I progressed to them later, as the urge to `thump' the keys was still there and I ended up with a long line of letterssssssss that didn't make sense. The keys were so sensitive and it took lots of practice to adjust to a lighter touch.......then.....along came computers!! Yes I know they've been around a long time, but the type of close keyboard that we use today, meant that I was `over-reaching' as the spaces between the keys was reduced. At last, I think I've got the hang of it......I had to retire before I made it though!!

Now.....if I could only work out where I have to put the darn ribbon on this thing, I'd be laughing!! |laugh1|

Glenys

Peggy
28-05-2005, 3:43 PM
I never did learn to type. No manual dexterity here. I use the Columbus method: look for a key and land on it. My first typing was done on a portable typewriter that my granduncle had used in France in 1919. When I was older and had gotten my very own portable Smith Corona for homework, the old machine was claimed by a nephew of the original owner. He probably pawned it. :eek: Many years later I saw its twin on display at the Smithsonian.

Peggy

Rod Neep
28-05-2005, 4:34 PM
I never did learn to type. No manual dexterity here. I use the Columbus method: look for a key and land on it. Peggy
Ah.... but when Columbus did it, he didn't even know that there was a place to land on. :D

That takes guts!

Diane Grant-Salmon
28-05-2005, 5:03 PM
Hi Glenys,
Quote: Oh dear.....now I feel really old!!
Actually, it was an old Royal typewriter...big, black and you had to thump the keys to actually get them to work!!
Snap! Aged sixteen, employed as an Asst. Cashier/Book-keeper by a firm of Solicitors, the Boss decided that I had to go to Night School to learn to type ...... don't know why, we only typed letters once a flood, reminding Clients to pay their Bills! ;)

The 'little' fingers on both my hands were always very sensitive and I couldn't get them to press down on those big, heavy keys! I cheated on the touch typing and used other fingers, got into trouble with the Teacher who told my Boss and I ended up in tears!

Luckily, my Boss was a little scared of the Cashier (she could have fiddled the books easy-peasy) so she told him it was a daft idea anyway, so I left before they threw me out.