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Peter Stines
08-03-2006, 5:00 PM
Is there someone who can search for passengers leaving the U.K. through London or Liverpool ? I am trying to find my kinsman, William Staines. He was born in 1820 and left England by 1840. His first stop was New York. He was in Galveston Texas by Dec. 1840. Any help appreciated.

Colin Moretti
08-03-2006, 7:45 PM
Hello Peter

Very unlikely, I'm afraid. To quote from the National Archives information leaflet on passenger lists: Generally speaking, emigration passenger lists between 1776-1889 have not survived.. See the full text of the leaflet at this URL:
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/rdleaflet.asp?sLeafletID=106

Sorry to disappoint you.

Good luck

Colin

Wirral
08-03-2006, 7:59 PM
Any other clues that may help to pin William Staines down? Any idea of county/town/area of birth? Did anyone else emigrate with him? Any other relatives? What was his occupation? Was he wealthy or poor? Any unusual family names that have been passed down through the generations?
This site may give some idea of where he came from http://www.spatial-literacy.org/UCLnames/Surnames.aspx

Geoffers
08-03-2006, 8:41 PM
Is there someone who can search for passengers leaving the U.K. through London or Liverpool ? I am trying to find my kinsman, William Staines. He was born in 1820 and left England by 1840. His first stop was New York. He was in Galveston Texas by Dec. 1840.If you know where he lived before he emigrated, there is just one possibility this early. Under the Poor Law Amendment Act 1834, Parishes were permitted to take out loans to cover the costs of those wishing to emigrate. These records exist at The National Archives (TNA) at Kew in document class MH12. The records consist of various bits of paper, including a list of those wishing to emigrate, ages, and intended place of emigration. On one found recently there was the name of the ship to be used as well as the sailing date - this addiitional detail is not common within my experience but would enable someone to find the port of embarkation, if not already known.

To stand a chance of locating records, you do need to know where someone lived as records are arranged by Poor Law Union and Parish.

Geoffers

Peter Stines
11-03-2006, 3:54 PM
I haven't been able to pin him down. All I've been able to find is "England" for his country of origin. His Confederate service lists the year of his birth as 1820. He arrived in Galveston Dec. 22, 1840. Nothing else. No known family was with him. By trade, he must have been working class. The 1850 and 1860 census of Galveston Texas lists the occupation as "drayman" and as "laborer". A dray being a wagon without sides. Staines faith seems to have been "Methodist Episcopal" at least that is the type of church he was married in. His wife's people were Protestant. I know this isn't much, but I'm still digging. (I found a Wm. Staines in Hatfield, Hertford, but NOT my man. That one was still in the U.K. in 1850)

Geoffers
11-03-2006, 7:08 PM
His Confederate service lists the year of his birth as 1820.
If they survive, have you been able to locate his full service record? Was he entitled to a pension as a result of war service? A side-branch of my family emigrated and one of them fought in the civil war - albeit for t'other side - amongst his pension papers was a certificate of baptism from his parish in England.

Geoffers

Wirral
11-03-2006, 7:30 PM
Do you know all of William Staines' family historyafter he went to the US? Were there any first or middle names that occur frequently down the generations? Liverpool & London were probably the 2 main ports for emigration at that time, with people coming from all over the country. Liverpool was the main port for those emigrating from Wales, Ireland, Midlands & Northern England. London for the South-east, South & East of England.

Even if we found a William Staines, born 1820 in England, at the moment there is nothing to say that he is your man. If you haven't already done it, I suggest that you try & go sideways with the family in the US - see if you can locate any other family members, follow their trees forward in time, hope someone descended from them has information that will lead you to the right person. You never know, you might strike lucky & find someone descended from William who has original family records.

Just had a thought. Have you found an obituary for William? Sonetimes they can give vital clues.

Peter Stines
13-03-2006, 4:30 PM
Staines was killed in Louisiana during the War Between the States. His death was "by accident" and happened on July 22, 1864. I've pretty well exhausted all my sources here in Texas. As far as other family, it looks like he was traveling alone. The name Staines doesn't appear to be too common here in the states. Family stories claim he came to New York first and went to Galveston "for his health". I wonder about that. Galveston had regular epidemics of yellow fever and small pox during the 1840's to 1870's.

Peter Stines
13-03-2006, 4:35 PM
If they survive, have you been able to locate his full service record? Was he entitled to a pension as a result of war service? A side-branch of my family emigrated and one of them fought in the civil war - albeit for t'other side - amongst his pension papers was a certificate of baptism from his parish in England.

Geoffers

I have his service records and they're pretty vague. It indicates birth in England in 1820 and that's it. As far as trades go, he seems to have been unskilled. He was listed as a "drayman" in 1850. He COULD read and write and I have several examples of his signature. Is it possible that he didn't KNOW exactly when he was born ? Maybe he was elusive about his place of birth because of a criminal past ?

Peter Stines
14-03-2006, 3:17 PM
Do you know all of William Staines' family historyafter he went to the US? Were there any first or middle names that occur frequently down the generations? Liverpool & London were probably the 2 main ports for emigration at that time, with people coming from all over the country. Liverpool was the main port for those emigrating from Wales, Ireland, Midlands & Northern England. London for the South-east, South & East of England.

Even if we found a William Staines, born 1820 in England, at the moment there is nothing to say that he is your man. If you haven't already done it, I suggest that you try & go sideways with the family in the US - see if you can locate any other family members, follow their trees forward in time, hope someone descended from them has information that will lead you to the right person. You never know, you might strike lucky & find someone descended from William who has original family records.

Just had a thought. Have you found an obituary for William? Sonetimes they can give vital clues.

I've been able to track Staines fairly well once he's here. Most of what I found came from tax rolls, census and deed records. I have someone looking for church records of his marriage. I just recently found two images of Staines wife, Anna Maria Smith and their son, Marion. Maybe Marion was named after Staines's father ?