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View Full Version : Archive CD Books - a double success



Geoffers
28-02-2006, 11:28 AM
Archive CD Books have just helped me twice!

For several years I've been trying to locate a HOSTLER family who emigrated to Madison County, New York, USA. They appear there in the 1850 census with just a birthplace of England recorded - well that narrows it down! A daughter married into a branch of my Lowe family from Norfolk.

Looking through records for Madison county, I was intrigued by how many surnames there, were common to Norfolk and have wondered if word had got back that there was good farming and it had spread around extended families back in England. I definitely identified one DYBAL family from North East Norfolk who appear in Madison County, others can possibly be connected too.

The head of the Hostler family had the unusual forenames of Easton James. I wondered if the 'Easton' was connected to the parish of that name in Norfolk and searching the 1851 census I found several Hostlers in the neighbouring parish of Costessey.

continued....

Geoffers
28-02-2006, 11:30 AM
His two daughters in the american census were both shown as being born in England - so I began searching the 1841 census using the Archive CD (http://www.parishchest.com/en-gb/dept_2433.html)facsimile copy. Yesterday evening I finally found them at Elsing, the entry clear as a bell on the grey-scale image:

HO107/763/07 f11 p17
Red Bridge, Mill Street, Elsing
Easton Hostler, 20, miller, bn Nfk
Martha Hostler, 20, bn Nfk
Hannah Hostler, 5, bn Nfk
Lucy Hostler, 3, bn Nfk
Paulina Hostler, 6mth, bn Nfk

After 30+ years of research, it's still nice to get success.

continued.....

Geoffers
28-02-2006, 11:32 AM
But where does the Second success involving Archive CD Books come in?

I retired to bed about midnight last night, a happy bunny. An hour later and my wife's cat is on the landing making a strangulated purring noise - a bit like gurgling is the best way to describe it. Kath (wife) got up to see what the problem was, put on the light, screamed "MOUSE" and jumped onto the bed.

An hour later, having chased the little bleeder all around the bedroom, we finally cornered it and managed to get a clear plastic lunchbox over the top. What can we use to slide underneath so that I could pick the whole thing up?
INSPIRATION!! I went downstairs and came back with the perfect solution, which can be yours too in return for signing up to life membership - An Archive CD Books mouse mat. Firm, thin, lightweight. Yes folks, heres the solution that tricky problem of what do you slide under a glass to help get rid of spiders, mice, etc - and it comes with the added bonus of discount off CDs purchased from Archive CD Books.

Oh, and the mouse? Carefully transported half a mile across a field to a hedgerow by Centenary Wood, where it ran off, apparantly unconcerned.

Now, does anyone know a good recipe for stuffed cat?
Geoffers

susan-w
28-02-2006, 12:04 PM
Thanks for that tip. Iíll be keeping my archiveCD mouse mat by the bed in future, as a wood mouse ran up the stairs this week. I was too slow to see where it went, though, but keep expecting to hear rustling in the night.

The tip is much appreciated ;)

mary elms
28-02-2006, 12:54 PM
An hour later and my wife's cat is on the landing making a strangulated purring noise - a bit like gurgling is the best way to describe it.Oh well do I remember that weird mixture of growl and purr from my childhood - it usually indicated mouse let loose under my bed.
Why mine - there were four others in the house - why not theirs?


After 30+ years of research, it's still nice to get success.Now that's what I call staying power! It must feel really sweet!

Mary.

AnnB
28-02-2006, 1:28 PM
Oh, and the mouse? Carefully transported half a mile across a field to a hedgerow by Centenary Wood, where it ran off, apparantly unconcerned.

Please don't tell me you carried out the transportation in the middle of the night in your jim-jams :o

And, of course, the special edition Archive CD 'mouse mat', has actually lived up to its name.......... ;)

Best wishes
Ann

Geoffers
28-02-2006, 1:41 PM
Please don't tell me you carried out the transportation in the middle of the night in your jim-jamsI did get dressed first, not wanting to be arrested for indecency


And, of course, the special edition Archive CD 'mouse mat', has actually lived up to its nameI did at first wonder if I may have breached the User Licence for the mouse mat, but I then thought that I wasn't offering to do lookups and that at Law it might be construed that I was putting the object to its natural use

Geoffers

Diane Grant-Salmon
28-02-2006, 3:18 PM
I retired to bed about midnight last night, a happy bunny. Geoffers

Hi Geoffers ......

Wonderful news about finding your HOSTLER family! The long wait was worth it in the end, seeing as we all got to share in the news, plus the funny story which followed. :D

I'm not frightened of mice, seeing as Big Bruv used to keep them as pets and I had a hamster, so I'm very pleased that you didn't bash it over the head!

I have a 'thingy' for catching spiders, bought years ago. A long handle with a big square high box attached at one end. The bottom slides out, put the box over the spider/bee/wasp and then slowly slide the bottom part back. Then just pop outside and open the slide again, so the spider can run away .... but not as fast as I do! ;)

busyglen
28-02-2006, 6:53 PM
I did at first wonder if I may have breached the User Licence for the mouse mat, but I then thought that I wasn't offering to do lookups and that at Law it might be construed that I was putting the object to its natural use

Geoffers


Well after all Geoffers....it is a `mouse' mat...surely that is what it is for! ;)

Glenys

Ron Leech
01-03-2006, 5:59 PM
[QUOTE=Geoffers] so I began searching the 1841 census using the Archive CD facsimile copy. Yesterday evening I finally found them at Elsing[QUOTE]

Geoffers you must spill the secrets of your methods or did you spend hours slogging through the pages like I invariably do? Is there a short cut I am missing?


I keep my Archive CD Mouse mat exactly where it should be underneath my mouse!

Ladkyis
01-03-2006, 6:13 PM
Slogging through the pages is how I end up doing it too. There is no easy way is there. I have to be really strict with myself and not chase after *interesting* names until I have found the one I started the search for - if you see what I mean.


Ann

Ron Leech
01-03-2006, 6:27 PM
I have to be really strict with myself and not chase after *interesting* names until I have found the one I started the search for
Hi Ann

I suppose I am generally lucky like that and only occassionally find myself getting distracted. I do find that the more closely related I am to the target the more difficult the task becomes. The census returns I really like are those which have an in law living with them so I can leap back another gebneration.

Geoffers
01-03-2006, 9:26 PM
Geoffers you must spill the secrets of your methods or did you spend hours slogging through the pages like I invariably do? Is there a short cut I am missing?Nothing you're missing. Just a case of narrowing down the probable search as much as possible using as many different sources as I can find - plus a bit of inspiration and then ploughing through records systematically - I usually make an index of all entries as I search, just to avoid having to go over things twice.

One of the drawbacks of programmes such as 'Who do you think you are' is that it doesn't convey the length of time it sometimes takes to locate an entry - and the frustration in searching - and the satisfaction at succeeding.

I remember many years ago being at Portugal Street in London (the census return films used to be viewed there in a rather shabby building) and seeing a chap start to stand up and begin to say in a loud voice "Ye...." and then realise where he was and sat down again. No one around him was bothered - some smiled; it's a feeling which we who browse records at length all understand.

Geoffers

Ron Leech
03-03-2006, 9:09 AM
Nothing you're missing. Just a case of narrowing down the probable search as much as possible using as many different sources as I can find - plus a bit of inspiration and then ploughing through records systematically - I usually make an index of all entries as I search, just to avoid having to go over things twice.

Geoffers
I had not thought of indexing, do you just list the area, street or the people? I do make a note at the time of the areas I searched. The greatest problem for me is when I am not aware of the area geographically and so don't have a feel for the place. As you say it can be very time consuming.



One of the drawbacks of programmes such as 'Who do you think you are' is that it doesn't convey the length of time it sometimes takes to locate an entry - and the frustration in searching - and the satisfaction at succeeding.

Geoffers
I don't think the BBC have done so but I would like them to make a programme making 'Who do you think you are' which shows some of the complexity of researching one of the more difficult characters listed.




I remember many years ago being at Portugal Street in London (the census return films used to be viewed there in a rather shabby building) and seeing a chap start to stand up and begin to say in a loud voice "Ye...." and then realise where he was and sat down again.
Geoffers

I think many of us have been there! I just managed to keep my mouth shut at the FRC one day when I found someone after a great deal of detective work.

Geoffers
03-03-2006, 11:53 AM
I had not thought of indexing, do you just list the area, street or the people? I do make a note at the time of the areas I searched.
I simply index surnames with folio and page number; and have begun indexing streets and places (e.g. pubs, schools, shops etc) with folio and page as well.
I put them in excel spreadsheets and add the class/piece and parish name when completed, along with filters. That way I can combine information in spreadsheets into a database which covers several areas. By adding a year I can combine different census returns and so fairly easily trace the comings and goings of family names. It all helps to relocate entries which seem later to be of interest.

For my one-place studies I am combining indexes to all the censuses, directories, service records, wills, surveys, parish registers, AT/BTs, subsidies, musters, etc into one complete spreadsheet (for Buxton, Norfolk the spreadsheet currently has over 12,500 entires).

It all takes longer to compile, but I end up with indexes which satisfy my needs and help me analyse records more quickly.

Geoffers