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clarefmshaw
04-12-2005, 5:47 PM
Could someone give me a definition of what a 'scholar' was at the time of the 1851 census?

many thanks
Clare

arthurk
04-12-2005, 8:37 PM
Could someone give me a definition of what a 'scholar' was at the time of the 1851 census?
Someone who attended school is what I've always taken it to be - but do you have some reason for thinking it might be something else?

Arthur

Lynda Cunningham
04-12-2005, 9:03 PM
Hi Clare

In 1851 parents were told only to record their children as "scholars" if they were over 5 years old and were "daily attending school or receiving regular tuition under a master or governess at home"

HOWEVER........... http://www.rootsweb.com/~engarc/CensusOccupations.PDF


best wishes
Lynda

clarefmshaw
05-12-2005, 5:09 AM
Many thanks Lynda - just what I needed to know!

Mandie
05-12-2005, 9:26 AM
HOWEVER........... http://www.rootsweb.com/~engarc/CensusOccupations.PDF


Thanks for the link Lynda, it was really useful. :)

susan-w
05-12-2005, 12:07 PM
Thank you, Lynda, that was really illuminating.

The article specifically mentions the example of "proprietor of iron mine".

Does anyone know, were there lots of iron mines owned by different people? (I have a distant inlaw who had that as their occupation)

Cheers
Susan

arthurk
05-12-2005, 5:03 PM
Hi Clare

In 1851 parents were told only to record their children as "scholars" if they were over 5 years old and were "daily attending school or receiving regular tuition under a master or governess at home"
... but I've also got a couple of 2 year olds listed as scholars in 1851, and I don't think they'd have had a governess - one father was a painter and grocer, and the other was a coal miner.

Arthur

Mythology
05-12-2005, 6:17 PM
It figures, Arthur, it figures. I expect if I looked through my lot there would be a few like that - I reckon half of them were either too dim to follow the instructions or just plain bolshie. :D