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  1. #1
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    Default How was a person rmoved who had died?

    In other threads, I have read on this site, I have discovered that while these registers were not compiled during 1940 - 1944, that, with the exception of 1917, they were completed for the other years of W.W.1. I also read that they were completed each June 1 for the following year

    So my questions are:
    1] If a person died between June 2 and May 31 how were they physically removed from the register to avoid re-igniting the emotions of the Family with whom that person had lived?
    and
    2] How were people made aware that they were on such a register in order to vote and who was responsible for notification of the authority of the appropriate wards when people moved out of the area?

    Colin

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    Administrator Ladkyis's Avatar
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    1. They would not be removed from the published register - they would not be sent voting cards as long as someone from the household had informed the correct department of the local council that the person was deceased.

    2. People have to register to be on the electoral roll. A form is sent to every household in the area, every year, and this has to be filled in and sent back to the council in the envelope provided (these days we can do it online) If you are moving out of the area it is your responsibility to inform the correct department that you are leaving so that they can cross you off the list in their office. It is also your responsibility to ensure that when you move into an area that you are put onto the register as soon as possible so that if an election is called you can vote.
    Last edited by Ladkyis; 25-03-2012 at 8:44 PM. Reason: more to say
    Ladkyis

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  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Ladkyis For This Useful Post:

    Colin Rowledge (25-03-2012)

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    Ten years ago I was having to work away from home so I bought a crash pad close to work and came home at weekends. Each year a form drops through all letter boxes asking for a declaration about who is entitled to vote in that household. So I got a form at each place, and but for my honesty I could have had two votes. I was and remain suprised that the electoral register is all down to self certification and people's honesty!

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    My son will forever be missing from the 2001 Census because, despite pestering the appropriate officials for a form, as his flat was too newly built for the authorities to have it on their database, they wouldn't issue him with a Census form to fill in. Hard to believe, but true.

    Yet another reason why you might not be able to trace your relatives on a census!
    malcolm99

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    Administrator Ladkyis's Avatar
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    Ah, Malcolm, thanks I had forgotten the option of bureaucracy. Sometimes people get very.... focussed.... don't they?
    Ladkyis

    “You can’t give her that!” she screamed. “It’s not safe!”
    IT’S A SWORD, said the Hogfather. THEY’RE NOT MEANT TO BE SAFE.

    I am fluent in three languages, English, Sarcasm and Profanity

  7. #6
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    So I got a form at each place, and but for my honesty I could have had two votes. I was and remain suprised that the electoral register is all down to self certification and people's honesty!
    Not really. It's an offence to vote twice in any one election.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Goodey View Post
    Not really. It's an offence to vote twice in any one election.
    ... but not necessarily to be registered twice. Actually, the rules might have changed, but in the 1970s we were told as students that we could register both at home and at the university address. I seem to remember that we could vote in local elections for both (presumably different authorities = different elections), but at a general election we had to choose which vote to use.

    Arthur

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    Yup. That's why I said "any one election". Megan could legally have been registered twice and could have voted in local elections in two different places. However, she would only have been able to vote once in a general election.

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