+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Famous for offering help & advice
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Lancashire
    Posts
    1,301
    Thanks
    139
    Thanked 454 Times in 413 Posts

    Default Apprentice Harpischord Maker

    In the Ancestry data set "UK, Register of Duties Paid for Apprentices' Indentures, 1710-1811" there is an entry in 1735 for Joseph Mahoon of St Martins in the Fields taking an apprentice John son of John Moore of ................. Gent.

    Am I wrong to be surprised to see the son of a "Gent" being apprenticed?

  2. #2
    Name well known on Brit-Gen
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    4,577
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 534 Times in 504 Posts

    Default

    I'd love to see this query answered.
    Having noticed the word 'Gent' applied to many seemingly unassuming chaps in the censuses, I'd gathered that the word was applied not only to the 'think they ares' but also to men who had worked their way into a postion of some worth, be it a land owner, business owner or just a darn nice fellow nor dependant on others for his welfare.

    Wouldn't any man who had the coin be happy to see his son in an apprenticeship for future stablilty?
    Happy Families
    Wendy
    Count your Blessings, they'll all add up in the end.

+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Select a file: