+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Loves to help with queries. wenfri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    220
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default Translation please

    Can't read this at all

    Margareta hutchinson virgo aetate integra quae abhinc biennieum ex oppidulo proximo commigravit huic viciniae
    supremo obiens diem

    and

    Maria hutchinson vidua

    Is it Latin?? or what

    Is there a translator online

    Wendy

  2. #2
    Super Moderator - Completely bonkers and will never change. Pam Downes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    (now) Sussex, England
    Posts
    4,695
    Thanks
    272
    Thanked 502 Times in 412 Posts

    Default

    Hi Wendy,

    Yes, it's Latin.

    This might help you to pick out some of the words.
    https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Lat...ical_Word_List

    ADDED: More links to Latin words http://www.
    cyndislist.com/languages/latin/

    Pam

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Pam Downes For This Useful Post:

    wenfri (16-07-2011)

  4. #3
    Brick wall demolition expert!
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    South London
    Posts
    3,681
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 1,146 Times in 1,130 Posts

    Default

    Yes, it is Latin. I.e.

    Maria hutchinson vidua = Maria/Mary Hutchinson widow

    You could try Google Translate - last time I looked it had Latin to English translation. I don't know how much sense it will make of your paragraph.

    http://
    translate.google.com/

    Back soon and will see what it makes of it.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to olliecat For This Useful Post:

    wenfri (16-07-2011)

  6. #4
    Coromandel
    Guest

    Default

    'virgo', literally virgin, maybe should be translated as spinster or maiden

    'aetate integra', something about her age, maybe 'of full age'? Edit: I have now found a phrase from Horace, 'mulier aetate integra', which is translated in Lewis & Short's dictionary as 'in the flower of her age' ('integra' meaning whole or perfect)

    'quae abhinc biennieum ex oppidulo proximo commigravit huic viciniae'
    who two years ago moved to this district from the neighbouring (or a nearby?) village

    I am struggling with the last bit. The meanings of the individual words might be as follows:

    'supremo' maybe last or final

    'obiens', dying

    'diem' = day

    But I am not sure whether they all go together as a phrase.

    (I see from Google that these entries come from the registers of Marske in Cleveland.)

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Coromandel For This Useful Post:

    wenfri (16-07-2011)

  8. #5
    Brick wall demolition expert!
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    South London
    Posts
    3,681
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 1,146 Times in 1,130 Posts

    Default

    Google translate doesn't do well with this.

    Using my dictionary, some words...

    virgin = virgin, maiden, girl of marriageable age
    aetate = age, period, generation
    integra = entire
    biennieum = period of two years
    proximo = nearest, closest, next
    oppidulum = small town
    vicinus : neighbor, resident
    supremo = highest, greatest, last
    obiens = To go to meet; to die
    diem = day

    I reckon it's something like ...

    Margaret Hutchinson, maiden of full age, who two years ago out of a nearby village migrated to this neighbourhood, died this last day.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to olliecat For This Useful Post:

    wenfri (16-07-2011)

  10. #6
    Coromandel
    Guest

    Default

    Sorry, olliecat, I didn't see you were already on the case. I didn't mean to butt in.

  11. #7
    Brick wall demolition expert!
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    South London
    Posts
    3,681
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 1,146 Times in 1,130 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coromandel View Post
    Sorry, olliecat, I didn't see you were already on the case. I didn't mean to butt in.
    That's alright - at least we are getting something similar. If a Latin professor appears, I'm going to slink away quietly.

  12. #8
    Name well known on Brit-Gen
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North London
    Posts
    5,150
    Thanks
    35
    Thanked 749 Times in 679 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by olliecat View Post
    I reckon it's something like ...

    Margaret Hutchinson, maiden of full age, who two years ago out of a nearby village migrated to this neighbourhood, died this last day.
    I reckon it is too.

    Looking at the image of the transcript on archive.org, the word is not supremo but supremu (with a bar over the last u, indicating an omitted final m).

    So I'd translate supremum obiens diem as 'dying yesterday'. The date of the register entry is 3 January 1650/1651.

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Kerrywood For This Useful Post:

    wenfri (16-07-2011)

  14. #9
    Loves to help with queries. wenfri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    220
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    (I see from Google that these entries come from the registers of Marske in Cleveland.)
    WOW!!!! You are people never cease to amaze me.

    The date of the register entry is 3 January 1650/1651.
    When you guys search you really go for the gusto. Will try harder to translate next time.

    Thanks
    Wendy

+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Select a file: