+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Loves to help with queries.
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    107
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Transported for life!

    Hi
    I am hoping someone can point me in the right direction!..
    I have a JOSEPH TWITCHETT born c1800 Suffolk, He was in trouble with the law a few times, and was transported for life in April 1838..
    He was aboard the ship Lord William Bentinck 2, Bound for Tasmania..

    The interesting thing is that his wife at the time of his transportation had at least 2 children, Her name was Susan, I have found her a Pauper in the 1841 census In suffolk..

    Joseph had a Ticket of Leave, ANd he appears to have sent for his wife and children, As i have found a record of Susan Dying in Australia in 1851, And his children lived there too..

    How would this have worked?.. If she was a pauper, How would she have been notified?.. Would Joseph have paid for her voyage?

    I didnt know if there were any records i would be able to view online?.. He appears to have been transported for stealing 2 lambs..

  2. #2
    -tmm-
    Guest

    Default

    The Tasmanian Archives have some documents available for free that might interest you.

    Follow this link http://search.archives.tas.gov.au/Im...CON31-1-44,180
    Convict surnames beginning with T ( Feb 1836 - Sep 1843) and U (Apr 1830 - Feb 1841) and V (Jul 1830 - Sep 1843)

    Joseph is on page 63 - Good luck trying to read it

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to -tmm- For This Useful Post:

    kellysmith1976 (10-09-2010)

  4. #3
    -tmm-
    Guest

    Default

    Also try this one:
    http://search.archives.tas.gov.au/Im...CON18-1-14,244

    This contains a physical description of each prisoner. I don't know what page Joseph is on though.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to -tmm- For This Useful Post:

    kellysmith1976 (10-09-2010)

  6. #4
    Loves to help with queries.
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    107
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thank you so much... I have found his physical description now... after much searching!!..
    Have you ever heard of the wife and family joining their convict partners?

  7. #5
    -tmm-
    Guest

    Default

    Yes, one of my distant relatives Robert Mutimer got transported (also for sheep stealing), and his wife went over there to join him. They had quite a large family together, and when he died she came back to England - I think leaving all the children behind. Though I think most, if not all, were grown up by this time.

    The recent BBC program 'Who do you think you are' with Jason Donavan sheds a bit of light into this. It was suggested that after a time in prison, they were given a type of parole and given jobs in the local community. It was also suggested that most cases of families following them over we paid for by the people they were working for. They also commented that it was very rare overall for this to happen due to the cost. I havent yet had a chance to do my own research into it though. The episode should still be available on iPlayer, so I recommend you watch it.

    Incidentally, my relative was made a police constable. He was eventually discharged after a few years for several counts of being 'drunk and disorderly'. Viewing his record was quite enlightening reading. You couldn't make this stuff up!

  8. #6
    A fountain of knowledge
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland
    Posts
    431
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 142 Times in 124 Posts

    Default

    " It was suggested that after a time in prison, they were given a type of parole and given jobs in the local community."

    In my limited experience, parole (or a bond or licence) was the norm. Only the really troublesome prisoners were imprisoned, often in places like Norfolk Island. The majority seem to have been sent off to work somewhere, as soon as they arrived. I think labour eas in short supply at that time. In my case I had a female relative who was transported for 7 years in 1830. According to my Australian researcher, as soon as she arrived she was placed on a farm belonging/rented to another convict who had been transported for 14 years in 1823.


    Elwyn

  9. #7
    Seriously addicted to family history research. spison's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Newcastle, Australia
    Posts
    1,109
    Thanks
    136
    Thanked 102 Times in 96 Posts

    Default

    Hi kellysmith,
    I don't know whether you've seen this site which does a good job explaining many situations involving convicts.
    http://www.convictcentral.com/

    I can't remember who paid for convicts spouse and children to accompany them AFTER their transportation. Occasionally they went on the same ship or close to the event but don't know who actually paid here either. There are cases where the convict husband was assigned as indentured servant to his free wife (he had to work for her.) Someone else may have more info on this.

    If you have trouble interpreting the conduct record on the Tasmanian archives, I have access to a book that explains all the numerous abbreviations they use.

    The only hit for Joseph on the NLA TRove was on the archived website 'First Families' on Pandora and you may like to contact the contributor.
    http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/10421/...hett1893471347


    Jane

  10. #8
    Loves to help with queries Philippa_Harvey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    246
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 12 Times in 8 Posts

    Default

    Don't know about English convicts, but the ones from Ireland were given the opportunity to apply for their families to come to "the colony" to join them after the sentence had been served. This was at "government expense" but I have yet to find out which government footed the bill.

    Not all families accepted the invitation to travel to the other side of the world, I have to say, and I'm quite sure that not all convicts took the opportunity to apply either.

    One of my Irish convicts (the one who ended up in Branxton, Jane) applied in 1829 (the year before he was due for release) for permission for his wife and family to join him. This was granted, but it took until 1836 and 1837 for the actual reunions to take place. His wife and one daughter came in 1836, his son arriving one year later.

    My only English convict married here, as did the other Irish convicts, so I don't know if they had left families at home or not so haven't found the need to research that side of things.

    Philippa

  11. #9
    Loves to help with queries.
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    110
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Hi Kellysmith, you might like to look at
    www.
    convictrecords.com.au very informative site.
    Regards
    Hilda
    Last edited by Kerrywood; 17-10-2011 at 11:16 AM. Reason: site contains advertising -- please read our Terms of Service

  12. #10
    Has a well deserved spectacular aura Sandra Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Darwin, Australia
    Posts
    833
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 127 Times in 78 Posts

    Default

    There's also:
    ****australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/convicts-and-the-british-colonies
    ****slq.qld.gov.au/info/fh/convicts
    ****members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/index.html
    Best of luck
    Sandra

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Select a file: