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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobinC View Post
    I'm wondering if the records I require aren't available any more.
    Ancestry is no guide as to whether records are available or not.

    For many London poor law unions, they have only the tip of the iceberg.

    As well as the Guardians' minutes suggested above, you may also want to look at these (depending on the children's circumstances):

    Register of children boarded out 1896 - 1919
    FBG/115/002

    Register of children emigrated 1899 - 1928
    FBG/117

    Register of cases of children and adults in institutions and schools 1900 - 1911
    FBG/119/001

    Register of cases of children and adults in institutions and schools 1911 - 1920
    FBG/119/002

    Reports and applications of children at schools and homes 1907 - 1911
    FBG/120

    Quote Originally Posted by RobinC View Post
    Access Restrictions: Not available for general access
    That simply means that you have to consult the microfilm (in this case X114/476) rather than the original document.

    Quote Originally Posted by RobinC View Post
    How do I access the paid research service?
    Please see here ...

    www.
    cityoflondon.gov.uk/Corporation/LGNL_Services/Leisure_and_culture/Records_and_archives/Family_Research/Family+History+Research+Service.htm

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  3. #52
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    Could this be Alfred in 1916?

    Name: Alfred Wetherall
    Gender: Male
    Marital Status: Single
    Age: 18
    Est. Birth Year: 1898
    Birthplace: England
    Year of Immigration: 1913
    Home in 1916: 20, Last Mountain, Saskatchewan
    Address: 27, 24, 2, Big Arm
    Racial or Tribal Origin: English

    Everything fits apart from the location but he was transported to Montreal in 1913 and attested in Leamington, Ontario in 1918 so could he have travelled to this area inbetween?

  4. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobinC View Post
    Going back to this post, I have looked at Thomas's attestation on the same website and it has his occupation as farm labourer so I think he is the Thomas that travelled from Bristol to Quebec in 1912. Unfortunately it doesn't explain where he was in 1911.

    A while back, I found Thomas's papers from WWI but can't seem to find it now, the reason I'm looking for it is because he asked for someone called Stanley to be notified if anything happened but I can't remember Stanley's surname.
    RobinC

    If you go back to post#36 where you quoted the info you got from BIFHSGO, you can see his surname - it was Stanley Beacon of Leamington.

    Mary Anne

  5. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobinC View Post
    Could this be Alfred in 1916?

    Name: Alfred Wetherall
    Gender: Male
    Marital Status: Single
    Age: 18
    Est. Birth Year: 1898
    Birthplace: England
    Year of Immigration: 1913
    Home in 1916: 20, Last Mountain, Saskatchewan
    Address: 27, 24, 2, Big Arm
    Racial or Tribal Origin: English

    Everything fits apart from the location but he was transported to Montreal in 1913 and attested in Leamington, Ontario in 1918 so could he have travelled to this area inbetween?
    RobinC

    I would think it very likely -- there were often harvest parties sent west during this time. Especially during WWI the farmers would be short-handed. The workers' way would be paid by the government or by the farmer in the destination location. The census was taken in June, so that could have been planting time there (rather than harvest). Looking at the census entry, it looks like he was a temporary resident to me, boarding with the farmer he was working for.

    Based on the various tidbits, it looks like Thomas, Alfred and Amelia were all settled in the Leamington area of Ontario, and from the looks of things all in the rural part of that area. so, between 1912-1914 when they were settled, the boys may have either stayed there or gone west temporarily to help with the harvest/planting. Given that they both enlisted in Leamington (Thomas in 1917 and Alfred in 1918) it would seem they wanted to go overseas with their friends there. You can order copies of their entire Canadian Expeditionary Force files by writing to Library and Archives Canada and quoting the reference information given with their online Attestation Papers:

    Name: WITHERELL, ALFRED; Regimental number(s): 2611922; Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 10512 - 9;Date of Birth: 17/03/1899

    Name: WITHERELL, THOMAS WILLIAM; Regimental number(s): 529171; Reference: RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 10512 - 15; Date of Birth: 20/07/1897

    To access the attestation papers and the requisition form and address to send to, you can go to the Library and Archives Canada website at collectionscanada dot ca and follow the trails to the Military>Soldiers of the First World War database, plug in their names -- above the accession information is a hot-link to the page about where you can obtain copies. LAC will accept a credit card request, and will send you the files - usually about $20-30CDN for each person's file, including copying and postage. The files will give you lots of extra info including what units they were with, when (you can follow their movements then in the War Diaries, also online at LAC) and when they returned to Canada and on what ships.

    You can find the scans of the passenger lists at Library and Archives Canada site also, an although you cannot search by the person's name, you can search by the ship's name and the departure and arrival dates, so you should be able to find them all relatively easily, scrolling through the pages of each manifest.


    Mary Anne

  6. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waitabit View Post
    I saw that Mary Anne, I wonder why the children left from different ends of UK? Perhaps to do with shipping avaiability & the home they were in.
    Wendy, I meant to answer your question before, but am only just getting a chance to do some replies ... quite often children were sent for training before being brought to Canada. One of the places, for example, was the emigrant homes run by Middlemore, who was in Birmingham. Children were sent there from the Unions all over England. As for the shipping -- from what I've seen, Liverpool was the most common port of departure for Canada.

    Mary Anne

  7. #56
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    Thanks Mary Anne,

    I couldn't see the woods for the trees so to speak.

    Thomas spent all of his time in England and Alfred enlisted 25 May 1918 at Windsor, Ontario, embarked in Vancouver on the SS Protesilaus 26 Dec. 1918 and arrived in Siberia 15 Jan. 1919, he worked at the Gomostoi Hospital, Vladivostok, embarked back to Canada on the SS Monteagle 21 April 1919.

    The above is from the information I quoted in post #36 and I can add that Thomas was treated for VD and gonorrhea at Camp Etchinghill, near Folkstone whilst in service, apparently this was a common occurrence.

  8. #57
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    Googling Camp Etchinghill came up with this on a forum:

    Canadian Hospital at Etchinghill 22/08/1916- 06/06/1919
    Thomas attested on the 4th of May 1917 so it is possible that he wasn't fit to serve in France during the war.

  9. #58
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    Robin, I have enjoyed this trip, I hope for you it's been an enlightening experience. Between here & there so many things have happened & with them so many more branches to climb out on. Hope you're still climbing!
    Happy Families
    Wendy
    Count your Blessings, they'll all add up in the end.

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  11. #59
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    I've managed to find out so much information from this thread so my thanks go out to everyone who had an input.

    I still have a lot to find out and a trip to the LMA will hopefully provide the answers, I will have to set aside a day or two as I have more than one avenue to explore should I ever get there.

  12. #60
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    Good luck, RobinC!


    Mary Anne

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