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  1. #11
    Occasionally, just very occasionally, needs an umbrella!
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    Quote Originally Posted by racing girl View Post
    BOWDEN/BAWDEN - Cornish form of Baudouin. Place name. Bowden appears in St Neot and Stratton parishes. It doesn't explain what Baudouin is though! Brenda
    Interesting! I have Bowdens too - mine came from Jersey to Cornwall (via other places - and, I believe, because of a family connection as yet unproved!). Baudouin is one of the derivations of Bowden - or maybe the other way around! - that comes up when I do searches for Bowden in Jersey.

  2. #12
    Scared of spiders but fond of frogs! Diane Grant-Salmon's Avatar
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    Thanks again ....... my KEVERN's were originally from St. Keverne too.
    Best Wishes,
    Diane

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    Loves to help with queries CanadianCousin's Avatar
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    Hi Brenda,

    I'd be grateful if you could find anything on any of the following names:

    CURNOE (or CURNOW)
    GRIFFEN (or GRIFFING)
    CREWS
    ROOK(E)
    TEAGUE
    TYZZER (or TIZZER)

    Thanks very much - this is very kind of you.

    Tim

  4. #14
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    [I] have always presumed that my nans name of Cornish just meant from Cornwall but would be interested to know what your book has to say please sandie

  5. #15
    Loves to help with queries racing girl's Avatar
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    For Sandie-
    Cornish/Cornwall - From Corn-wealas meaning stranger of the horn or headland. It was the name given by the Saxons to the people of Kernow (Cornwall)


    For Tim-

    Curnow - From Kernow meaning Cornishman. May also be the name given to descendents of the Irish Kerns, who were 5th century invaders.

    Griffin - Though of Welsh descent this name has been recorded in Cornwall for four centuries. (No specific listing for Griffen/Griffing)

    Crewes - No listing

    Teague/Teagle - From tek meaning fair or beautiful as in place names Nanteague and Rosteague

    Tyzzer - Variant of personal name Teudar (see Tudor)
    Tudor - Personal name as in Cornish King Teudar. Place name Lestowder (St Keverne) and Bosteeda (Crowan)

    Rook(e) - No listing, but I have a friend from Devon who has it in her history, she said it was a very old Devonshire name. But I found this on the SurnameDB web site:

    Surname: Rooke
    Recorded as Rook, Rooke, Rouke, Ruke, Rookes and possibly others, this interesting surname is medieval English. It was originally a nickname given to one who had some fancied resemblance to the bird, maybe of dark hair and complexion, or perhaps ruthless and grasping! In 13th century when this name was first recorded, humour was very robust, it was the time of Chuacer, and people obviously did not take offence in the same way as they would today. The famous name Kennedy for instance, translates as 'ugly head,' a description which does not seem to have harmed their overall progress. This name derives from the pre 7th Century word 'hroc', and examples of the name taken from surviving rolls and charters include William le Roke in the Assize Rolls of Somerset in 1243, William Ruk in the Tax Subsidy Rolls of Sussex in 1296, and Richard le Rouke in the same rolls but for Somerset in 1327. An interesting namebearer was Lawrence Rooke (1622-1662), an early astronomer, and fellow of King's College Cambridge. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Roc, which was dated 1185. He was a Crusader and is recorded in the Knight Templars rolls of the city of Oxford, during the reign of King Henry 11nd, 1154 -1189. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

    SurnameDB has this for Crewes:
    Surname: Crewes
    This interesting surname, with variant spellings Crew, Cruise, Cruse, Cruwys and Crouse may be of three possible origins. Firstly, it may be of English locational origin from "Crewe", in Cheshire, recorded as "Crev", in the Domesday Book of 1086, "Crue" in 1346 in the Index to the Charters and Rolls in the British Museum. The placename is composed of the Welsh word "cryw", stepping stones. Secondly, the surname may derive from the Medieval English "cr(o)us(e)", bold, fierce, a nickname for a fierce bold and daring person. Finally, the surname may perhaps be of French habitational origin from "Cruys-Straete" in Nord, from the Gaulish word "crodiu", hard. One Richard de Crues was recorded in the Curia Rolls of Devonshire in 1214, while the Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire list a Robert Cruse in 1275. Sir Thomas Crew or Crewe (1565 - 1634) was a speaker of the House of Commons. On August 3rd 1618, Francis, son of Robert Crews was christened at St. Pancras, Soper Lane, London and Elizabeth Crews married James Kiff on February 14th 1830 at St. James, Paddington. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Nicholas le Criuse, which was dated 1213, Curia Rolls of Bedfordshire, during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

  6. #16
    Loves to help with queries JohnN's Avatar
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    I don't have any Cornish ancestry, but my goodness, these postings are interesting!
    Thank you Racing Girl!

  7. #17
    Loves to help with queries racing girl's Avatar
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    Hi John
    I was surprised by what's Cornish and what isn't (according to the book anyway). Just randomly opening the book I see, Hayne, Hare, Hammill, Hancock and Harvey to name just a few!

    I bought the book for my own Cornish names of Doney, Gumb and Goyne, but they're not in there!! So I thought I'd be useful for a change instead of just asking questions! As you say, it's very interesting.

    Brenda

  8. #18
    MarkJ
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    Gynn sounds as if it should be a variant of Jynn (and other spellings) which is Cornish for engine? I would be surprised if it does derive from jynn, as it probably pre-dates any ideas of engines, but you never know! Sounds like the surname is pronounced in the same way as the word for engine - i.e as in English gin.
    A quick pronunciation note - the letter Y is usually pronouced like the captial E, so ky (latterly spelled ki in the more modern Cornish spellings) is pronounced like key. Ky is the word for dog by the way - hence places such as Kynance Cove.
    Technically the word Chy, which is found in a lot of places in Cornwall is pronounced almost like chee , but usually most folks pronounce it as shy - unless they speak Cornish.

    Mark

  9. #19
    Loves to help with queries racing girl's Avatar
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    Mark
    How did you learn Cornish?

    Brenda

  10. #20
    Starting to feel at home.
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    Hi Brenda

    Many thanks for the wonderful information, I will have more soon.


    Thank you


    Brad

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