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Zen Rabbit
22-01-2011, 9:01 AM
I now have the will of Seth Staunton of Worfield dated 1674 which has three parts. this is the crucial one for me as it confirms George Staunton (Stanton) of Baswich as the son of Seth dated 1687.
if the link works I wonder if anyone fancies a crack at it?
http://o.mfcreative.com/f1/file10/objects/c/0/c/ac0c1d86-2e73-40c8-949c-aaea86c05edf-0.jpg

Zen Rabbit
22-01-2011, 9:14 AM
this is the second part.
http://o.mfcreative.com/f1/file13/objects/9/f/d/d9fd50be-7f2e-490d-956a-efb41909eb0f-0.jpg

Zen Rabbit
22-01-2011, 9:15 AM
this is the actual will.
http://o.mfcreative.com/f1/file08/objects/e/5/e/8e5ecf24-2953-4c16-abe4-456a79d56e8b-0.jpg

olliecat
22-01-2011, 1:24 PM
this is the actual will.
http://o.mfcreative.com/f1/file08/objects/e/5/e/8e5ecf24-2953-4c16-abe4-456a79d56e8b-0.jpg

Well, I only just learned to read wills, with the help of master will reader Geoffers and Kerrywood. However, I'm tempted to have a go at this page for practice - and because I find wills fascinating.

Hmm! I'll give it a go and if the results look OK I'll post, otherwise I'll go and hide.

Geoffers
22-01-2011, 1:49 PM
To deal with the third part first, as that is simplest:

Be it known unto all men by these psents that I Seth
STAUNTON of Stanley in the County of Salop Yeoman for
divers good causes and consideracons mee specially moveing
have been given granted and by these psents doe and grant
unto my son George STANNTON and unto my daughter
Jane STANNTON and to theire own proper use for ever
all and singular all my goods and chattles reall and psonall
plate ready money wares debts bills and bonds and all
other my sessions and things whatsoever the same be
moveable and unmoveable as well quick as dead and
of what nature kind qualitie or condicon so ever the
same be of and whose hands custody or possession and
ever place or places the same are or shall be found -
To have and to hold all and singuler the sd goods chattells
plate ready money debts wares and things affore
specifyed unto the said Seth STANNTON and unto the onely
and proper use and behoofe of my sd son and daughter
theire /heirs executors and admrators or assignes for ever without
any clame or demand thereunto or to any part or
percell thereof be made by me the sd Seth STANNTON
my executors administrators or assigns of or any
other pson or persons whatsoever and for the better
testimony of the truth herein and the execution of
the same gift I the sd Seth STANNTON have put my s(e?)l
son and daughter in full possession of the prmissis unto
the use and behoofe aforesd by the delivery of one piece
of silver to the same Geo: STANNTON and Jane BILLINGSLEY
in the name and possesion of all the sd goods chatells
plate mone debts & things whatsoever afforesd In -
witness whereof I have subscribed these psents and have
selaed and devliered the same as my deed the 25th day
of J(o?)uly in ye yeare of or Lord God One Thousand Six
Hundred Sevety & Foure
sealed & delivered
in the psence of
Michael BILLINGSLEY
William WILLES Seth STAN~TON

olliecat
22-01-2011, 2:03 PM
Just finished one page but pipped by the master. So will leave well enought alone. :D

Zen Rabbit
22-01-2011, 2:08 PM
That is brilliant Geoffers. I find it hard to disentangle some of the words.
As an aside it seems now that Jane married Thomas Billingsley so Michael could have been her father or maybe a brother.

Zen Rabbit
22-01-2011, 2:13 PM
Thanks too to Ollicat your effort is appreciated too :yes:

Geoffers
22-01-2011, 2:28 PM
Part 1.........Latin...........ugh? Latin...........(please anyone do amend this):

Noverint vniid per pntes nos Georgiu STAUNTON p(oe?)
Baswich in com Staffordie Miller et Wm(.R)d Nightingale de
civitate Lich: Taylor
Seneri et firmr obligari Richo Ra(m?)es Milite et Lega Doctore
Comr~io Genali Rsdim Chri patris & Dm Dm Thome pmione
Dia Lich & Coven Epi Ch(ine?) felicit in centum

Libris bone & legatis monete Aug 8 solvendis eid Richo RAINES
aut suo certo Attornato raetoribus adtoribus vol assignatis suis ad
quam quid soluco~em bone & fidelr faciend obligamus nos et
utru(q?)(.?)irud p se p(....?) & in solido Leredes exres et ad tores
nostres - firmr per prdtes sigillis nris sigillat dat vicesimo
septimo die mencis decembris Anno Dm 1687 Annor RRs
Dm nostri Jacobi SecundiDei Gratia Angl & c

The condicon of this obligacon is such that if the above bounden
George STAUNTON naturell and lawfull sonne of Seth STAUNTON late of Worfield
(Hom & decd?) To whom the adion of all and singular the goods rights and
credits of the sd decd is by the above named Dr Richard RAINES
comitted and granted do and shall well and fauthfully admstr
ye sd goods & chattles according to the tenor or a deed of guift
or instrument made by the said deceased to him the
sd George STAUNTON -
And make yeild up and exhibit unto the sd Dr Rich RAINES
or any other competent judge in this behalf authorized a true &
perfect invenry (Acct?) paymt and delivery of all and singular
such goods and chattles of the sd decd as the sd admrat shall have
receive admstr or may lawfully come by by vertue of the sd
letters of adion to be dividedordered and adminstred as by ye sd
Sr Richard RAINES or any other competent judge in this behalfe
shall seem to stand w(th?) equity and justice and lastly do and shall
upon therieown proper costes and charges save defend and
keep harmeless the sd Sr Rich RAINES and all other officers
and minsiters of this behalfe authorized for comitting and
granting the sd letters of adion then this bond to be ver(....?) [poss.verified?]
or else to stand in full force & vertue

Sealed and delivered
in the prsence of
Nath Hinckes

Gorgii Staunton

Zen Rabbit
22-01-2011, 2:35 PM
Well done Geoffers. Any idea what it means? The latin bit.

Kerrywood
22-01-2011, 3:25 PM
Well done Geoffers. Any idea what it means? The latin bit.

I believe it’s an administration bond, setting out the penalty payable (£100) if the terms of the bond weren’t met, that is if George didn't adminster his father's estate properly in accordance with the law.

Lots of gaps and queries and guesses, but ...

Noverint universi per p(re)sentes nos Georgius STAUNTON p(…?)
Baswich in com(itate) Staffordie Miller et W(illelmu?)s Nightingale de
Civitate Lich: Taylor
teneri et firm(ite)r obligari Rich(ard)o Raines Milite et legato Doctori
Com(iss)ario Generali Rsdim Chri patris & Dm Dm Thome p(ro)mi(ss)ione?
Dea Lich: & Coven Epi…. Chr… fulcit in Centum ---- ----

Libris bona & legalis moneta Ang(licana) & solvendis eid[em] Rich(ard)o Raines
aut suo certo Attornato Extoribus Ad(iu)toribus vel assignatis suis ad
quamquid soluc(i)o(n)em bene & fidel(it)er faciend(um) obligamus nos et
(utr….d) p(er) se pl…? & in solido heredes ex(ecutor)es et Ad(iu)tores
nostros --- firm(it)er per pod…tes sigillis n(ost)ris Sigillat Dat Vicesimo
Septimo die mensis Decembris Anno D(o)m(in)I 1687 Annoq(…) RRs
D(o)m(in)I nostro Jacobi Secundi Dei Gratia Ang &c

Know all men by these presents that we George Staunton (….?)
Baswich in the county of Stafford Miller and William? Nightingale of the
city of Lichfield tailor
are held and firmly bound to Richard Raines, knight, doctor of laws
(……………………) of Thomas (………..)
Deacon of Lichfield and Bishop of Coventry to pay one hundred
pounds of good and lawful money of England to the same Richard Raines
or to his true representative executors assistants or assigns
for which payment well and truly we do bind ourselves
(………… ) and our heirs and executors sealed with our seal the twenty
seventh day of December in the year of our Lord God 1687 (…....)
and of our Lord James the Second of England etc.

Hopefully someone can help fill the gaps ...

Kerrywood
22-01-2011, 3:36 PM
this is the second part.
http://o.mfcreative.com/f1/file13/objects/9/f/d/d9fd50be-7f2e-490d-956a-efb41909eb0f-0.jpg

Geoffers, are you working on the above (John Husband), because if so I won't bother ...

Geoffers
22-01-2011, 3:40 PM
Geoffers, are you working on the above (John Husband), because if so I won't bother ...

Do feel free to have a play, have to walk the dogs in a minute.



PS - Sorry, I completely forgot about the 2nd bit

Zen Rabbit
22-01-2011, 4:06 PM
Thanks very much for all this. It is a shame they wouldn't let me borrow the originals ;) they were much clearer, although the copy is pretty good.

Kerrywood
22-01-2011, 4:26 PM
Do feel free to have a play
Sorry, but I canít read enough of this Latin scrawl to offer a useful transcription, or a proper translation.

I think this second document may simply be the grant of administration made by the Lichfield church court (in the person of John Husband, a senior cleric) to George Stannton. It refers to him as George Stannton of Baswich in Staffordshire, the son of Seth Stannton of Worfield, who died intestate.

As there is an administration bond (above), it would appear that the will itself never went to probate, and a grant of administration was made instead. Perhaps the will was deemed invalid because executors weren't appointed?

Maybe Geoffers or someone else can offer more help.

Zen Rabbit
22-01-2011, 4:53 PM
That's an interesting thought.

Geoffers
22-01-2011, 7:51 PM
As there is an administration bond (above), it would appear that the will itself never went to probate, and a grant of administration was made instead. Perhaps the will was deemed invalid because executors weren't appointed?

Maybe Geoffers or someone else can offer more help.

The 2nd page is in a truly appalling scrawl. I cannot make any more of it than Kerrywood already has managed to interpret.

Zen Rabbit
23-01-2011, 8:47 AM
Thanks to both for all your help though. I doubt that I could have made head nor tail of it on my own (certainly not the latin bits)

Kerrywood
23-01-2011, 9:37 AM
A couple of further thoughts on this ...

(1) As there was an inventory (post #9), it might be worth asking the record office to check whether it survives. These are not always catalogued together with wills/administrations.

(2) In the grant of administration (the Latin scrawl, referenced in post #15), there should be a maximum value stated for the personal estate. I think this may be in the last few lines ...

ejus bona
quorum valore(m) fide(m) fecit non ex tem(.....?) ad summa(m)
10 l(ibri) Den(ari)is(?) ...

his goods
the value of which he swore did not exceed? the sum of
10? pounds in money ...

(To be honest, I'm not certain whether the figure is £10 or £70, though the digit does look different from the 7 in the date given at the top, 1687).

You can use TNA's currency converter (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/currency/default0.asp#mid) to check those values in today's terms.

Zen Rabbit
23-01-2011, 10:13 AM
I think I will be returning to Lichfield again when I get the chance as I hadn't realised that they held original documents for wills and such and I feel that there may well be more for me to discover there in other branches of my tree.
Interestingly there were other Stanton wills there including ones for a Dorothy Stanton at Avon Dassett and a William Stanton from Newport, which I looked at but dismissed. I now think I may have been to hasty in that as there may well be some connections will the early Stantons of Salop who may have come to Stafford (as William from Newport did) and formed a different branch of the family.
I see what you mean about the £10 or £70. It doesn't look like a one but is not the same as the seven above either. It could be a hasty correction but I might have to go back and look at the original to check for any clues.

Thanks once again for your help. I will contact Lichfield to see if there was an inventory.