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ColinClarke1945
27-03-2011, 4:30 PM
You'll find more about my research of this 'target person' at the Brickwall topic, so I won't go into it here !

Basically, as far the 'Court Records' topic query goes: 'My man' being researched (Richard CLARKE) was apparently a juvenile inmate at Chesterton Union (Cambridge) Workhouse c1840-c1850 and his two summary punishments there for misdemeanors (which may state parents name, or father's whereabouts if the mother is dead??) don't seem to be recorded anywhere - although they are referenced in his later committal papers at Cambridge County Gaol for another offence.

The reason I would like to see something about those 'summary punishments' is that Richard's 1851 committal papers for Cambridge Gaol are absolutely bulging with details about the 19 year old young man - it's a bonus to have a great grandfather with a 'record' when you are doing Fam Hist !! Height, hair, eyes, intelligence, description, read/write, even the tattoo and where ... !

Can anyone give me a lead here, please ... should the records be found where I found the 1851 record of his imprisonment, or were workhouse punishments not recorded there?

And, does anyone have access to the Chesterton Union (Cambridge) Workhouse microfiche for a look-up?

Colin

PS Edits ... the words are "... in prison before ... twice summarily convicted of misconduct in a workhouse".

Jan1954
27-03-2011, 4:59 PM
Hello Colin - welcome to Brit-Gen,

Are you a member of the Cambridgeshire Family History Society (http://www.parishchest.com/Cambridgeshire_FHS__LID2149)? If not, I would heartily recommend that you join.

I have ancestors from Cambridgeshire and the Society (and its resources) has been very helpful. :smile5:

ColinClarke1945
27-03-2011, 5:10 PM
Thanks for the Welcome, Jan !

Yes, I'm a member of the CFHS, and have been a correspondent since pen and ink days in the 70s. It is truly a fine organization with lots of friendly people. Ditto, for the Fulbourn Society. As more transcribing has taken place, it has become more helpful to those from 'off'. They do have a fiche I believe, in the Bookstall, but there is no point in me getting a fiche, especially if after all the effort it turns out not to have anything I need.

Cheers,

Colin

Coromandel
27-03-2011, 5:15 PM
Hi Colin

The reference to Richard being 'summarily convicted' means that he had appeared before magistrates, who (without a jury) convicted him and decided on the punishment. You may find details of the case in court records (petty sessions). There's a handlist of petty sessions records (http://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/852182A1-9DFB-4B96-894D-4F58C1FFBD35/0/HandlistofPettySessionsrecords.pdf) held at Cambridgeshire Archives. I'm not familiar with the area, so don't know which petty sessional division would be the appropriate one. There seems to be great variation in how much has survived, and for what date, between the various divisions.

There may also have been reports in local newspapers. Without knowing the dates of Richard's offences your best hope is to try online newspapers. You can, for a fee, see nearly 50 titles on the British Library 19th Century Library Newspapers site; many libraries give their users free access to these (and a second batch) via the Gale Cengage site.

Regarding workhouse records, Cambridgeshire Archives should be able to advise you on what records they hold for the Chesterton Union. Alternatively, seek out a copy of the relevant volume of Poor Law Union Records, by Jeremy Gibson et al., for a list of known surviving records. I think Cambridgeshire is in Vol. 1 ('South East England & East Anglia').

Jan1954
27-03-2011, 5:20 PM
Alternatively, seek out a copy of the relevant volume of Poor Law Union Records, by Jeremy Gibson et al., for a list of known surviving records. I think Cambridgeshire is in Vol. 1 ('South East England & East Anglia').Absolutely correct and available here (http://www.parishchest.com/index.php?cmd=viewproduct&cat=&id=P80406&pageOffset=0). :smile5:

ColinClarke1945
27-03-2011, 5:21 PM
Excellent stuff, Coromandel ! Thanks so much.

Petty Sessions !! That's the difference I had missed. Still don't understand why the actual imprisonment is not shown on the Gaol records - maybe the workhouse villains were not recorded ...

I'll contact CRO - they've been very helpful before via email etc.

Cheers,

Colin

Peter Goodey
27-03-2011, 5:56 PM
twice summarily convicted of misconduct in a workhouse

This suggests to me that he breached the workhouse rules and was summarily punished by order of the Master and Guardians (extra oakum picking, bread and water for a week etc :biggrin:). This would be recorded in the workhouse offences and punishment book which may or may not have survived.

olliecat
27-03-2011, 6:12 PM
See here (http://calm.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/ArchiveCatalogue/dserve.exe?dsqIni=Dserve.ini&dsqApp=Archive&dsqDb=Catalog&dsqCmd=Browse2.tcl&dsqItem=KGCh/A&dsqKey=RefNo) for holdings related to the Chesterton Board of Guardians (Poor Law Union).


The Guardians Minutes (http://calm.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/ArchiveCatalogue/dserve.exe?dsqIni=Dserve.ini&dsqApp=Archive&dsqDb=Catalog&dsqCmd=Browse2.tcl&dsqItem=KGCh/A/AM&dsqKey=RefNo) may be worth pursuing, particularly the minutes covering the 5 October 1848 to the 22 July 1852 as well as earlier minutes.

Coromandel
27-03-2011, 6:22 PM
This suggests to me that he breached the workhouse rules and was summarily punished by order of the Master and Guardians (extra oakum picking, bread and water for a week etc :biggrin:). This would be recorded in the workhouse offences and punishment book which may or may not have survived.

I thought the term 'convicted' implied an official charge, not just something dealt with in the workhouse? I certainly have seen newspaper reports of workhouse inmates appearing before magistrates for offences such as tearing up their clothes, refusing to work, smashing windows, and so on.

olliecat
27-03-2011, 6:26 PM
On Ancestry, there are two criminal register entries for a Richard Clarke in Cambridgshire. The first with a trial date of 3 Jan 1850. The second with a trial date of 3 Jul 1851. This second one makes reference to a previous offence.

Peter Goodey
27-03-2011, 6:39 PM
I certainly have seen newspaper reports of workhouse inmates appearing before magistrates

Yes. I suppose it was a matter of whether there was actually a crime committed or just a breach of the rules.

ColinClarke1945
27-03-2011, 7:33 PM
Many thanks to all, so far, for the assistance and notes ! Wonderful.

Yes, Olliecat, I have lots on Richard's various errant ways including his assistance in the duck stealing 1850, and the ham and bacon caper in 1851 - from Ancestry, UK Archives, and Fulbourn Chronicles. Both of the other involved thieves (Marsh 1850 and Mason 1851 respectively) didn't get off so lightly - Marsh transported to VDL (Tasmania) and Mason to Western Australia. Others in the village and expanded family, including Hancock and Hart families, got 14 years or Life transportation for crimes such as taking bread and cheese.

Given the over population, and the lack of work for labourers etc., it's no wonder that the general area around Cambridge saw such an exodus heading for the various colonies when assisted passage/labour recruitment started. There wasn't a big future in stealing food.

Richard Clarke, for all his trials and tribulations as a youngster, went to Australia as a free man in Nov 1856 on the PARSEE, and in due course purchased 120 acres which he turned into a productive decent-sized farm for that pre-machinery era. (It is now a vineyard.)

Getting back on track here :-)) I will try to find what I can from CRO, hoping to see if the father, Mr [blank], is recorded. I suspect, however, that pre his mother's early death in 1845, she would be listed, and post 1845, perhaps the stepfather only. But one can hope !

Cheers,
Colin

ColinClarke1945
27-03-2011, 7:43 PM
By the way, as we are on a roll here with Courts and legalities, please see this link (Post #2) about the term Referee. Who/what were they?

http://www.british-genealogy.com/forums/showthread.php/67386-Richard-CLARKE-b-c.1831-Fulbourn-Cambs-UK

CC

ColinClarke1945
04-04-2011, 10:07 PM
Just for the record.

We have exhausted the Cambridge Workhouse records of inmates, punishments, and apprenticeships for Richard CLARKE (or HART), so it is now on to the Guardian's Minutes at CHESTERTON.

AT least I am fairly certain that Richard CLARKE was not at the Camb Workhouse.