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Matblack
16-01-2008, 8:11 PM
http://img293.imageshack.us/img293/640/anyideasqo9.jpg

Pupil Teacher? Hes only 16 and later goes in to become a Bailiff

Thanks

MB

suedent
16-01-2008, 8:13 PM
It's "Pupil Teacher", something akin to what we'd now call a Classroom Assistant.

Matblack
16-01-2008, 8:15 PM
Ahhhh, great thanks

This census taker seems to have particularly bad handwriting :D

Any ideas on what it says after Carpenter?

http://img514.imageshack.us/img514/4578/anyideas2ju8.jpg

Thanks again

MB

suedent
16-01-2008, 8:17 PM
Any ideas on what it says after Carpenter?

http://img514.imageshack.us/img514/4578/anyideas2ju8.jpg

Thanks again

MB

"Town Crier"

Now if that's right it's a stroke of luck as there is the potential for loads of information!

Jan1954
16-01-2008, 8:17 PM
Town Crier (Cryer in today's spelling...)

Jan

Peter_uk_can
16-01-2008, 8:19 PM
Re Pupil Teacher.

I have come across these before in an round the 1800's and they were for persons between the ages of about 16 to 19.

So with what look likes the actual term being accurate, I guess the next question is how, why and what they would have actually done.

Not sure what the school leaving age was back then.

v.wells
16-01-2008, 8:20 PM
Town Brewery? Actually that's not bad writing, I have seen far worse! It's easier if you can find similar lettering on other pages.

Jan1954
16-01-2008, 8:22 PM
I have come across these before in an round the 1800's and they were for persons between the ages of about 16 and 19.

So with what look likes the actual term being accurate, I guess the next question is how, why and what they would have actually done.

Not sure what the school leaving age was back then.

I have "pupil teachers" in my tree, the youngest being 14. I have a feeling that the school leaving age was 12 (by the way, that's the age my Gran was when she left school in 1906 and went into "service")

Jan

suedent
16-01-2008, 8:24 PM
From sources I have read Peter I think that their main tasks were helping the younger children with their reading & writing etc. For girls they'd probably help with the needlework too.

Many village schools (I can't speak for town schools) consisted of one, maybe two rooms with children of all ages and abilities sitting together. A potential nightmare for teachers. A pupil teacher will have been invaluable.

Browneyes
16-01-2008, 10:42 PM
Hi,

When I've come across words I can't decipher straight away on the census pages this is what I try...

print out the whole page and carefully just cut out the word you're trying to decipher making sure you can see the word clearly. Then compare the letters to others on the page...hopefully the whole page has been written by the same person and you will be able to recognise the way they write and join certain letters.

Hope that helps.

Browneyes x

Sue Mackay
16-01-2008, 11:35 PM
Pupil teachers were often either charity pupils or children from families of modest means who wouldn't normally have been able to afford the luxury of continuing their education as teenagers.

Matblack
17-01-2008, 12:01 AM
I've been through the census for this relative and it is Town Crier, it turns out he was also a county County Court Bailiff!

The Pupil Teacher went on to become a National School Master!

Finally some members of my family with prestige, it beats Port in a Potato Warehouse which was the previous one I found :D

Thanks for all your help guys

MB

Peter Goodey
17-01-2008, 1:06 PM
The Pupil Teacher went on to become a National School Master!

The pupil teacher system was the standard method of teacher training until the early 20th century. In the late 19th century pupil teacher centres were established but in earlier period the headmaster was directly responsible for training.

jeeb
17-01-2008, 1:39 PM
Re Pupil Teacher.



Not sure what the school leaving age was back then.

Hi Peter,

A form of schooling was provided in England during the earlier decades of the 19th century by churches and Dame schools but these were by no means compulsory.
The 1870 education Act stated schools should be provided for all children under a fee paying system but it wasn't until 1880 that school became compulsory for all 5-10 year olds.
The fee paying system was abandoned for general schooling in 1891 and in 1899 the school leaving age was raised to 12. My own father left school at 13 in 1937.

Jeremy